Bitcoin isn’t just an unknown commodity: it will always be an unknown commodity. Bitcoin doesn’t have the fundamentals that investors typically use to analyze an asset. Most stocks or bonds can be analyzed based on some trait of the instrument. Stocks have P/E ratios and dividends, for example, while bonds have return percentages. Bitcoin has no fundamentals that can be easily measured.
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Everything is laid out in a simple step-by step system that is easy to follow. As a student, you can choose between two video courses; a basic and an advanced one. Both of the programs are designed to first give you a strong foundation and then gradually, in a logical succession, build on that knowledge. The basic program will offer you plenty of knowledge and insight to trade successfully on your own, while the advanced course takes it further, equiping you with deep understanding of advanced trading techniques and strategies.
You could try this instead: Be sure to watch an exchange’s order book to better understand the actual prices you can get for the amount of cryptocurrency you’re trading. Consider breaking your order into smaller pieces to get a better price, or use a trading algorithm that lets you execute your larger order as a stealth order at the top of the order book.
The first thing you need to do before you invest in a crypto is to analyze its trading volumes. As a rule, always go for cryptos that have high daily trading volumes, unless there are some big upcoming news about a low volume crypto. High volumes signal to a Crypto’s liquidity, and the presence of an active community. The problem with low volume cryptos is that in most cases, they lack a strong community backing them, and they can easily get delisted from exchanges, leading to losses.
To read Part 6 of BTCManager’s ‘A Guide to Trading Cryptocurrency,’ click here. In this trading guide, we will introduce you to a useful concept that can be used for trading, amongst other things. Linear regression is a simple, easy-to-use strategy that can be utilized to identify entry and exit points based on the price action of the cryptocurrency. What…
Common sense doesn't apply for some traders. In October, Spatafora started trading bitcoin, litecoin and ethereum to learn about the market and understand whether any of the coins were undervalued. Instead, he found that many of the investors exhibited irrational exuberance in believing the virtual currencies would never stop their climb in the market.
This is a typical recommendation coming from stock and Forex markets. There is a probability of a strong and significant price wave when rumors appear. Those who buy on rumors have greater risks as there are still no facts to prove them. However, they also have better profit opportunities as trends are in their initial phases in moments when such rumors appear.
You could try this instead: Be sure to watch an exchange’s order book to better understand the actual prices you can get for the amount of cryptocurrency you’re trading. Consider breaking your order into smaller pieces to get a better price, or use a trading algorithm that lets you execute your larger order as a stealth order at the top of the order book.
On top of that, the cryptocurrency market travels at lightspeed compared to other markets. New coins enter the market on a daily basis (in 2016, there were about 550 different coins, today there are about 1,500), and each one has news every day. I’m not doubting your ability to consume and analyze news, but that level of information bombardment will always be more effectively consumed as a group. In these communities, you’ll see members link news and relevant articles about coins you’ve invested in and coins you’ve never heard of. The community will definitely expand your knowledge much faster than doing it all yourself.

Especially for traders dealing with fairly large amounts, multiple, small entries and exits over a fixed period of time (dollar-cost averaging) can help obtain a good price for an asset over an extended period of time. Consider using time-weighted average price trading: specify n, t, and p such that you buy or sell n of a cryptocurrency over t hours for an average price of p.

ICOs, as you may have guessed, are much like IPOs. This is where coins are offered for the first time to the public. ICOs are not offered through exchanges, but rather you buy them directly from the creators of the project. Usually (it’s different for each project) you will send them Bitcoin or Ethereum that they will use to fund their project; in turn you receive a certain amount of their new coin.


On top of that, the cryptocurrency market travels at lightspeed compared to other markets. New coins enter the market on a daily basis (in 2016, there were about 550 different coins, today there are about 1,500), and each one has news every day. I’m not doubting your ability to consume and analyze news, but that level of information bombardment will always be more effectively consumed as a group. In these communities, you’ll see members link news and relevant articles about coins you’ve invested in and coins you’ve never heard of. The community will definitely expand your knowledge much faster than doing it all yourself.
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