Closing a trade in profit. It is important to take your winnings out of a trade. Cryptocurrencies move faster downwards than they do upwards, and you don’t want to be late cashing out of a trade. You also don’t want to be too early and miss out on extra profits. There are a lot of techniques to help you make this decision that are out of the scope of this beginner’s guide.
The cryptocurrency market is insanely volatile in 2018. You can make a fortune in a moment and lose it in the next whether you trade Bitcoin, another coin, or the GBTC Bitcoin trust. Consider mitigating risks, hedging, and not “going long” with all your investable funds. TIP: If you trade only the top coins by market cap (that is coins like Bitcoin Ethereum), or GBTC, then the chances of losing everything overnight are slim (not impossible, but slim). Other cryptocurrencies are riskier (but can offer quick gains on a good day).
You should have a general understanding of what a cryptocurrency is because knowing the functional use of a coin can give you an edge when deciding your investments. There are hundreds of coins ranging from major players like Bitcoin (BTC) and Ethereum (ETH), to smaller coins that we refer to as “altcoins.” Each coin is unique and offers their own flunctional use cases. If you’re feeling unclear about what a cryptocurrency is, check out some of the resources below. They give great explanations of Bitcoin and Ethereum, and blockchain, the underlying technology of which cryptocurrencies are built upon.
Bitcoin Trading in Tight Range With Lowest Volatility in Months BTC Hitting Oct 2017 Support, GBTC Hitting Sept Support You Are Going to Need Ether for Coinbase Wallet There Was a Major Bug in Bitcoin’s Code, but Developers Fixed it Van Eck SolidX ETF Postponed International Bitcoin Transfers 1,000s of Times Cheaper than Banks Charlie Lee Busts FUD in Epic Twitter Posts (i.e. a List of Reasons Why Litecoin is Awesome) The CNBC Fast Money Counter Indicator Bitcoin Flash Crash at Cboe XBT Expiration Date; Most Alts Refuse to Panic BTC is Trapped Under Some EMAs and Has Been Most of 2018
Bitcoin isn’t just an unknown commodity: it will always be an unknown commodity. Bitcoin doesn’t have the fundamentals that investors typically use to analyze an asset. Most stocks or bonds can be analyzed based on some trait of the instrument. Stocks have P/E ratios and dividends, for example, while bonds have return percentages. Bitcoin has no fundamentals that can be easily measured.
From a trader’s perspective Smith also discussed key BTC prices, namely the $5,800 support level and the $6,800 resistance level, noting that the recent lows of bitcoin are practically the same ones that were touched in April and February, earlier this year. Curiously, these were the same points BTC was trading at last October when bitcoin futures were announced and the price of the world’s most popular virtual currency skyrocketed.
You could try this instead: Be sure to keep reading crypto news and price analyses — not just staring at charts. Even though you shouldn’t give in to the FOMO and FUD generated by many crypto articles, you still need the news in order to stay apprised of market conditions. Also consider setting stop-loss orders to ensure that your losses will be mitigated in the event of something like contagion. 

If you are going long, consider building an average position (for example via dollar cost averaging or value averaging). There is no better way to avoid making a poorly timed trade than buying incrementally instead of all at once and thereby buying an asset at its “average” price over time. If you don’t have a really solid grasp of technical indicators and the way the volatile crypto markets work, consider averaging out of positions as well. Averaging isn’t just financially conservative, it is important psychologically. Taking too big of a position at once can be emotionally difficult to deal with (and can thus lead to bad decision making) given the historic volatility of the cryptocurrency market.


Trading on low-volume days in the market could incur substantial slippage. People who make trades — especially large trades — on low-volume days often will not find many partners on the other side of the order book willing to make that trade. The result is that they could end up paying much more for the trade than expected, incurring slippage in the process.
In order to keep your crypto investments safe, you can keep your records in a separate hardware wallet and keep a track of your trading stack. Features of some cryptocurrency exchange platforms may vary from other platforms and that’s why it is important for you to find the one that matches your needs. Once you are sure about the exchange that fulfils your requirements, go ahead and trade.
The day I first heard about Bitcoin on Reddit, a friend had also called me to tell me about it. We spent most of our friendship talking about Ayn Rand and programming, so when we heard about a currency that was software and couldn’t be controlled by governments we were very interested. I purchased $600 worth of BTC and my friend and I planned on buying a mining rig.
Read Part 3 of BTCManager’s series, ‘A Guide to Trading Cryptocurrency,’ here. In Part 4, we look at a very easy to pick up technique that, like the Ichimoku Kinko Hyo, originates from Japan. Renko charts are another Japanese technique that is easy-to-use and reliable for making profitable trades. Similar to candlestick charts, Renko charts are even easier to analyse…

This may seem like a silly question but am I able to buy and sell any and all cryptocurrency on the apps you listed? I wish I had seen this article a lil sooner…when searching for an app I read nothing but great things about coinbase. But it’s terrible. Fees are absurd, I can only buy (haven’t sold any thing yet bc I’ll incur more fees when I do so I’m waiting til its REALLY worth cashing in) 5 cryptos, and I can only get alerts for 3 of those 5. It’s awful. I want to be able to but whats looking good without having to pay crazy flat fees PLUS surcharges and international fees. It cost me $3 every time I buy…but I will divide my money up for the day to keep buying as it drops lower. So if I have $500 to put it, I’ll buy $100…if it drops I’ll buy another $100 and so on. But that will cost me $15 just to buy it. Is there an app that allows purchases for ALL cryptos with low fees????
One of the biggest draws to Binance is the super cheap transaction fees. Since Binance are in the startup phase, the fees really are some of the least expensive out there. Binance charge nothing for new deposits of coins onto the platform and just 0.1% on the value of trades. To put this in perspective – if you were to use your Bitcoin to buy $100 of Ethereum, Binance would charge you 10 cents.
(BTW, don’t you love the price predictions on Bitcoin that pundits come up with from time to time? Talk about a wide price and time spread. And they are always disclaimed with something like “these predictions should be taken with a grain of salt” and “do your own research” and “this is no way constitutes investment advice”. Imagine if there was a “sell side analyst” job in crypto. Talk about a great gig…)
Cheap fees and fast exchanges. For each trade, the exchange platform you’re using will take a small percentage as commission for the service it’s providing. This is inevitable. Where cryptocurrency trades differ from their fiat currency equivalent is in the size of this fee. Because the fees for transferring cryptocurrencies (typically via wallet payments) are cheaper than credit card and bank transfer fees, cryptocurrency-trading fees are cheaper than forex-trading fees.

Coinbase/GDAX will want more personal information than you’ll feel comfortable giving them; there is no way around this. The more information you give them, ID, Bank account, credit card, etc., the higher your limit and the less restricted your account will be. Don’t let this scare you off from becoming a cryptocurrency investor. Every other exchange user went through this process; you have to also. Since you have to trust someone, Coinbase/GDAX is a good bet.
Consider seeking out opportunities to practice and master using the lingo. It might not suffice to idly read terms like ‘MA’ or ‘DCA’: many new day traders get their feet wet by using these terms in conversations, in real life and public forums like Reddit. People often find that they learn better when they actively discuss the things they’re learning, finding the best ways to explain it to others.
I’m not going to go too deep into other ways you can earn money with cryptocurrencies because I don’t do them myself. At least not right now. Passive income is great. After you make an initial investment, you mostly sit back and watch the money roll in. It’s like buying a home and renting it out - there will be some maintenance issues but it’s mostly passive income.
No, the successful trader is not me. I’ve gotten lucky a few times and I’m still refining and trying out strategies; on the other hand, I’m part of communities of people who trade on a daily basis to grow their portfolios, and while some of the results can be attributed to luck, a majority of it is based on fundamentals, good habits, and experience.
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