Don’t zoom in too much on the price trends of the moment; don’t sweat the small things. It’s easy to zoom in and get stressed when Litecoin goes from $220 to $213 (or something like that). However, these little movements only matter if you are day trading large amounts of coin relative to your total investable funds. Zoom out a bit and look at trends over larger periods of time. Don’t think of that $213 relative only to $220, think of it relative to the $100 Litecoin was at a few months back, the $400 it was at after that, and the $100 it was at just a little while ago. From that perspective, a fluctuation between $220 and $213 is nearly insignificant. I will rarely make trades on timeframes shorter than 2hr candles, and I generally am looking at 6 hr and 1 day candles, because I value my sanity and am focused on the long term trajectory of crypto. That only changes in very specific instances and with purpose. If you zoom in too much, you lose sight of overarching trends (many of which are actually stronger indicators of what is actually happening).

So far, everything we’ve discussed has involved taking a long position on a coin. That is, our focus has been buying a coin at a lower price than what we think we will be able to sell it at later. What if we have some indication that leads us to believe that the value of a coin is about to decrease? In this case, we could take a short position, which is the same technique that made some people boatloads of money during the 2008-2009 housing bubble.


So far, everything we’ve discussed has involved taking a long position on a coin. That is, our focus has been buying a coin at a lower price than what we think we will be able to sell it at later. What if we have some indication that leads us to believe that the value of a coin is about to decrease? In this case, we could take a short position, which is the same technique that made some people boatloads of money during the 2008-2009 housing bubble.
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All of the different techniques used to track the price of Bitcoin and other currencies have one common factor- they require investors to remain up to date on the latest market movements. In addition to keeping track of the cryptocurrency market, it’s also necessary to buy and sell on an exchange, select a Bitcoin wallet, and make analytical interpretations of the statistical data gathered during market observation.
Once you have narrowed down on cryptos with high daily trading volumes, focus on their historical price movements. The best way to do this is to use a financial ratio known as the Sharpe ratio.  Don’t worry about calculating it, since you can easily find it online.  The Sharpe ratio measures the potential return of an asset based on its volatility.  Figures higher than 1 are usually a sign of an asset with high potential returns. Given that cryptos had a stellar year in 2017, most of them have a Sharpe ratio of higher than 1.  Therefore, for you to make use of this ratio, narrow down on cryptos that have the highest Sharpe ratio relative to the rest of the market to Profitable Cryptocurrency Trading
ICOs, as you may have guessed, are much like IPOs. This is where coins are offered for the first time to the public. ICOs are not offered through exchanges, but rather you buy them directly from the creators of the project. Usually (it’s different for each project) you will send them Bitcoin or Ethereum that they will use to fund their project; in turn you receive a certain amount of their new coin.
Market orders allow us to exchange any amount of coin right away at the current market price. Orders are filled using the best available price in the exchange’s order book. For example, if you placed a market buy order for $100, it would buy from the lowest priced sell order(s) until you had used that $100. The advantage is that this transaction is always completed immediately; the disadvantage is that we don’t know exactly what price we are going to get.
I am not your guru. I’m a crypto enthusiast, not a professional trader, and I make plenty of mistakes. There are a huge amount of ‘gurus’ and ‘experts’ out there but the truth is that many of them haven’t got a fucking clue what they are talking about. Opinions in cryptocurrency are like assholes, everybody’s got one. It’s extremely easy to predict the market and hell, everybody seems like an expert, when cryptocurrency is experiencing a bull run.
Hey Will. Thanks for the helpful guide! I’ve just gotten into crypto and found this info extremely useful. Just a question regarding how you keep your alt coins safe. As far as I can tell, you can’t keep many of these alt coins on a Trezor hard wallet, so do you just use something like My Ether Wallet instead? Cheers mate! Here’s to a cracking 2018!!

If somehow, you’ve only heard of one cryptocurrency, it’s probably Bitcoin. It is the biggest cryptocurrency — it currently has a 40%i share in the total cryptocurrency market cap! It is the oldest cryptocurrency and it still dominates in the market. So, if Bitcoin continues to increase like it did in 2017, then investing in Bitcoin might be a good idea for 2018.
The top of the order book will show you the lowest price at which someone is willing to sell a cryptocurrency, and the highest price at which someone is willing to buy it — but that doesn’t mean you can buy or sell the amount you want at that price. In fact, the amounts of a cryptocurrency that people are offering to buy or sell at the top of the order book are often quite small, which means that, if you’re trying to buy or sell a larger amount, you’ll have to go deeper into the order book: finding a counterparty who’s offering a price that isn’t as good as the “market price.”
Another tip is to try and determine why the value of a particular cryptocurrency is rising or falling before you make an investment. Buying a coin that’s in freefall and waiting for its value to increase again may seem astute, but there’s no guarantee that it’ll bounce back. Chasing gains by backing a currency that’s surged can also seem tempting, but there’s always the risk of “pump and dump” schemes where the price crashes afterwards. Know the “why” before you buy.
The second reason to buy the most liquid coins is that there are risks of scams. When you purchase Bitcoin you are sure that you will be able to sell it to somebody later. However, when you buy X coin, which is not as liquid and as popular as Bitcoin is, your risks are higher as everything depends in this case on the project, its team, goals, roadmap, background etc.
There are lots of studies about emotion in trading. Fear of missing out, greed, etc. are very common causes for people to make mistakes while trading. No matter how experienced you are, you will eventually be led by emotions and this might make you lose money, so you have to prepare yourself to do it as little as possible and to control yourself better or you will lose more than win.

Ideally, a rookie trader should start by choosing a reliable exchange and playing with popular coins, such as Bitcoin or Ethereum. However, the learning by doing approach is too slow for those who want to succeed fast. Joining a community of like-minded traders could be one of the best decisions to make: there are plenty of groups on Telegram or regular meetups in the US and other countries.

Cryptocurrencies are not all the same. Some are mined while others are created all at once and slowly released into the market. Some cryptos earn a type of interest when owned and some are tokens used by innovative development networks/platforms. Other considerations like the maximum supply of a cryptocurrency, alternative uses (other than being an exchange medium), can greatly influence its future performance.

Hey Will. Thanks for the helpful guide! I’ve just gotten into crypto and found this info extremely useful. Just a question regarding how you keep your alt coins safe. As far as I can tell, you can’t keep many of these alt coins on a Trezor hard wallet, so do you just use something like My Ether Wallet instead? Cheers mate! Here’s to a cracking 2018!!
Crypto is really unpredictable. While reaping profits of hundreds of percent, the section withstands now and will continue getting dozens of billions of dollars erased flat out in the future. When Bitcoin loses its value against the US dollar Altcoins usually go through the same process. Simple math shows that even holding a part of the portfolio in Altcoins, such as Ethereum and Litecoin, is usually not enough to avoid getting a big chunk of the portfolio’s USD worth wiped out following a Bitcoin dump.
If you are going long, consider building an average position (for example via dollar cost averaging or value averaging). There is no better way to avoid making a poorly timed trade than buying incrementally instead of all at once and thereby buying an asset at its “average” price over time. If you don’t have a really solid grasp of technical indicators and the way the volatile crypto markets work, consider averaging out of positions as well. Averaging isn’t just financially conservative, it is important psychologically. Taking too big of a position at once can be emotionally difficult to deal with (and can thus lead to bad decision making) given the historic volatility of the cryptocurrency market.

Accept that coins can go to zero, and even good coins can lose up to 80% of their value (especially against BTC). There are many coins that didn’t make it to 2018 that were once highly valued and popular. Meanwhile, even some giants of today like ETH and XRP have seen their value in BTC prices drop to depressing levels. You should prepare for this mentally and have a strategy that factors this in. If you buy the dip in ETH from .15 down, .08 may look like an excellent price, but you have to be ready for .02. ETH holders who didn’t prepare for this had a depressing June 2017 – December 2017. Heed my warning, that new coin doesn’t have to moon twice, it can go to literal zero, and even those that will moon again… they can have long seasons of stagnation in between (where they lose value against BTC for months on end). See the Crypto Graveyard and please look at the historic charts of major alts like XRP (the gap between moons is real and some coins really don’t make it).

I am new to crypto currency trading – having been a bonefish, permit and tarpon guide in the Caribbean- I am truly outside my knowledge base.. I figured out how to set up an account on Coinbase, buy on Binance and make some money. What I can’t figure out is how to get my money out of Binance. Example how do I get Tron into Bitcoin and over to Coinbase. It keeps asking me for a Tron wallet. And how can I move my coins off the exchange into an account I control and not have to sell them / convert them to get them off or out of Binance?


At that point, you can begin trading. You can submit market or limit orders. The orders will be filled as soon as your buy/sell order can be matched to a corresponding one. Most exchanges only offer this limited structure for placing orders. However, a growing number of exchanges now allow more complex orders, including the option to go long/short on a stock and to employ leverage.
So how do you know if you should invest in an ICO? It’s not about science, it is important to pay attention to the level of seriousness of the project and its team. Look for the project’s website (does it look like a child has built it during computer school?), Who is the team behind the project – Are they hiding behind nicknames or proudly present themselves on their website? Pay attention to the Bitcointalk thread (does it exist at all?) and how the team members respond to technical questions. Is there a large community behind the project? Expect to see a Slack gathering its community. Watch out the amount raised: A project which had raised too little will probably will not be able to develop over time, a project which had raised huge amount – there won’t be enough investors left out there to buy coins on exchanges. And most importantly is risk management. Never put all eggs in one basket and invest too much of your portfolio in one ICO.
This is the perfect opportunity for investors with the available funds to buy the undervalued cryptocurrencies. As a trader, you use your expertise to assess the market conditions and fundamentals to predict when the market is most undervalued and likely to make a recovery soon. Then, just make your trades and hold out during the period of fear and uncertainty, all while making a nice profit when the market returns to sanity.

Now I have my strategy that I stick to without letting my emotions interfere. I have a set of coins that I like trading so I only look at those charts. I have patterns and indicators that I look for on those charts so I can quickly flip through them. Within minutes I can set my orders, set alerts on my desired entry and exit prices, and walk away from the computer.
An unbreakable rule in trading says that you should never involve your emotions in trading. This is a basic rule for anyone who trades over any term, but especially for the ones who trade for the short term. Imagine buying Bitcoin according to the DCA strategy: Let’s say the Bitcoin price had crashed by 40% in three days. Now what? Obviously it is the time to buy a second portion of the coin (according to DCA) and average the initial trading entry price. But instead, almost everyone I know got “cold feet” exactly at the “terrifying” moment of decrease and had not completed the purchase of the second share. Why does it happen to us? One word – emotion. Emotions, in this case – fear of loss, affects us and completely disturbs our plan of action. If you are one of those (yes, the majority) who won’t buy the second share in the example above – you should consider your future as a trader, a crypto trader in particular. Getting over your emotions is also important after an unsuccessful trade or after you have sold a coin which is sky rocketing just after you sold it (FOMO). To sum up, don’t regret profit you’ve missed and don’t feel guilty about lost trades. Set yourselves a plan of action together with a set of goals, and act accordingly – as if you were a pre-programmed computer. Human beings are not rational creatures.
Certain candlesticks contain powerful clues about the direction of order flow and where the price is likely to go. The mighty engulfing bar is one of them and marks levels where reversals are likely to occur. Engulfing the entire price range of the preceding candle says much about where the big market players are putting their money. More about engulfing bar crypto trading coming soon!
Dad advice: Aim to buy low, sell high; try not to buy high, sell low. Look at the price trend, if we are at the highest point it has been in the past 24 hours (days, weeks, etc), that is inherently riskier than buying at a short term low. It can make sense to buy as the price starts to break out, but buying after a breakout at a new high while filled with excitement is a little “irrationally exuberant.” This is to say aim to “buy the dips” and often “the best time to buy is when there’s blood in the streets… even if it is your own.” Conversely, the worst time to buy is often (but not always) right after the price has shot up and everyone is manic. If you do buy high, and it ends up dropping shortly after, consider HODLing (to “HODL” is to Hold On for Dear Life as the price goes down. It is what you do when you buy high and then neglect to set a stop or if you are going long and can’t or don’t want to cash out yet). Buying the dips and holding can be dangerous in a bear market, and it can put pressure on you to sell low if you overextend, but its still often better than FOMO buying the top. Sometimes it can be wise to sell for a loss or to buy when the price is at a local high, but knowing when this is the case requires a rather high skill level. Thus, although rules sometimes are best broken, start by aiming to buy low and sell high.Two last points 1. Knowing when to take a loss is hard, buying the dips and holding is easy. 2. The dips WILL happen, you must be patient and ward off FOMO!

Now that you’re well-versed about the types of crypto exchange platforms available in the markets, you might think it’s time for you to get started with the investments. Not yet though! Like stock exchange and money trading, crypto trading is not a piece of cake. You need to learn the basics, gather all the necessary information, and get prepared before ultimately heading towards investments. Here’s a list of things to check before finalising an exchange:
Here again, it is important considering a number of factors when choosing a stop loss level correctly. Most traders fail when they fall in love with a trade or the coin itself. They may say, “Here it will turn around, and I will get out of this trade with a minimum loss, I’m sure”. They’re letting their ego take control of them and unlike the traditional stock exchange where extreme daily movements are considered 2-3% in value, Crypto trades are a lot more riskier: in my life as a trader I’ve seen a coin dumping by 80% just in a few hours! And nobody wants to be the one who is left holding it.
The truth is that bitcoin is the hottest trading market right now, hotter than stock trading, oil trading, gold trading and any other market at this point. The reason people believe this is going to continue to be a hot market is because blockchain technology which is what allows transactions to happen without a central exchange. Here is another strategy on how to draw trend lines with fractals.
Take profits. Some investors think “taking profits” is a dirty phrase, but it is a rather conservative strategy none-the-less. Taking profits can result in you making less money than you would have if you did nothing and just “let it ride”… but that is only true if Bitcoin goes up over the long term. If you have hefty profits, consider taking them off the table, and then waiting for a lower price in the future. Worst case, you can buy back in at a higher price later (leaving some potential profits on the table). TIP: If a coin just went up 400%… consider taking some profits. Cryptocurrency almost always corrects at some point after a big run. I personally would say HODLing after making 400% gains is called GREED. I won’t ever sell my full stack in one chunk, but I’m going to start averaging out when the MACD turns bearish after a 400% – 1,000% run if the run was somewhat organic. If the run was the result of a pump and dump, then I will likely take it all off the table quickly. Pump and dumps are frustrating events, like I said, watch out for manipulation.
What makes the platform appealing is the easy process of opening an account and getting verified. It also provides users with the options of dealing in ample amount of crypto pairs with ultra-security features. Another noteworthy point here is that the platform offers 15+ free & automatically generated digital wallets as well as a variety of payment and withdrawal methods including cards, e-wallets, wire, and crypto-wallets.
React to “the Mood of the Market,” But Otherwise Pick a Strategy and Stick With It. The market changes moods, and some strategies are better than others in a given market. So you’ll likely want to evolve your strategy as the market changes, and you learn. However, you’ll also likely want to avoid things like going long for most of the year, but then 9 months into your investment you start day trading when the market is down. Sometimes it can be tempting to change one’s strategy to adjust to the current market (for example if the market is bearish and trading in a tight range), however, this can get you in real trouble if you don’t make very careful moves. A long investor who starts going short will start realizing capital gains and will risk being in fiat if and when there is a recovery (recoveries, like corrections, can come on very quickly and without warning). If you do switch from long to short, make a commitment to yourself to buy back in upon a certain event occurring (like the 5 day EMA crossing the 50 day on 6 hr candles; something like that). I’ve hear countless stories of plans to buy back in, they often end with “but I didn’t,” those are the stories told in bull markets by very sad people.
BTC saw a pump last night that only lasted about 10 minutes in terms of the significant part of the move. Since then we have consolidated for 9 hours giving some of the move back. This is still healthy consolidation on the 4 hour and even a potential bull flag. Bulls are trying to hold the back test of 4 hour EMA supports. We are still in a 4 hour lower high ...
Let’s say on your cryptocurrency chart at 250-minute candles, you see 25 candles where the price stays within a 100 point range. If the price contracted to a daily move of just 20 points, you’d be seriously interested and alert. You should see lots of overlap. This tells you there is a substantial chance the price is going to continue into the trend.
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