I would also encourage you to have a secure place to keep your passwords, maybe written down in a couple of locations or stored in a password manager, just create something which works for you. Also, keep a copy of your private key for each wallet. If you lose your access and lose your keys, then you lose your coins. Don't worry; this is not necessary with every wallet, for example Coinbase and a Nano S will manage your private keys for you, this will all start to make sense once you start.
If your focus is to conduct crypto-to-crypto trading, Binance is one of the best options. Ranked as one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges worldwide, they provide you with impressive offerings along with an extremely low trading fee. Although the Binance platform is a young entrant into the market, it is rapidly growing, and holds a huge selection of altcoins with Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Tether pairings.
For people who don't pay attention to development trends - one observation of high significance is Go popping up in the popularity list associated with Ethereum. Why is Go in particular an important sign? It's almost as fast and less clumsy compared to C++ and C Sharp. At the same time, it's relatively new. People who know Go are experienced and choosing to learn it because it is better. In my opinion, it will be the default backend language for most Silicon Valley tech companies in the next 5 years. Those same people are choosing to play around with Ethereum using Go.
Hey, Will, I like this! Thanx for the info. I’m somewhat new to cryptos but not to investing — my Dad invested in the stock market since I was a kid and as an adult I was a registered investment advisor representative for a large US institution. One conclusion I’ve come to is that the skills and approach for crypto investing are no different than those for the stock market. I use the same strategies and analyses I use for stocks and etf’s and feel completely at home in the crypto market. Yes, I deal with more brokerage accounts, etc., but the principles are the same.

Mean reversion is where the investor assumes that the price of a coin will remain at an average price level over time.  Upward trends, and downwards trends, are expected to revert back to the average over the long haul. This means you need to know the charts well and be able to figure out what the average price for the cryptocurrency you intend to trade in. When the coins are less than the estimated average that is when one wants to make a few purchases. When the price is higher than the average it is expected to drop back down to the mean price and that would be the time to sell.  Of course, figuring out just when to sell is the trick, and that is where the gamble comes in.


I prefer to trade on decentralized exchanges. For myself, I made a choice in the form of ethnermium.сom. They have a huge number of coins. There are no minimum restrictions on trade and fees are so insignificant that you will not notice them. I also think the advantage of the easy creation of a wallet like MeW and easy integration with metamasks and a high level of security
ACTION: Go out and find a few other people that trade, find people you trust. Start a group chat on Facebook messenger — or on whatever platform you prefer. Each of you should research 2–3 credible sources to begin following and then delegate the sources equally. Each day your team should study their respective sources and relay only the necessary information to the group, focus only on information that is crucial for advising trading decisions.
Perhaps the deadliest mistake a trader can make is letting emotion get the best of them. Those with the wrong mindset will lose in the long run; Whether it’s losing a trade and trying to get it all back by chasing a phantom opportunity that was never really there, or winning a huge trade just to get too greedy and giving it all right back. Set a clear goal each time you sit down to trade and walk away once you’ve hit your goal. Do the same for loses. Walk away and come back tomorrow. There will be opportunities will be there the next day, I promise.
So-called “hot wallets” make accessing your crypto easy – allowing you to transfer funds and complete trades quickly and with ease. Many providers now offer mobile apps so this can be done on the move. Meanwhile, “cold wallets” are stored offline – commonly on USB sticks – with some people even writing down their private keys on paper. The latter can work well if you’re looking to save crypto for a rainy day.

The first thing you need to do before you invest in a crypto is to analyze its trading volumes. As a rule, always go for cryptos that have high daily trading volumes, unless there are some big upcoming news about a low volume crypto. High volumes signal to a Crypto’s liquidity, and the presence of an active community. The problem with low volume cryptos is that in most cases, they lack a strong community backing them, and they can easily get delisted from exchanges, leading to losses.
What makes the platform appealing is the easy process of opening an account and getting verified. It also provides users with the options of dealing in ample amount of crypto pairs with ultra-security features. Another noteworthy point here is that the platform offers 15+ free & automatically generated digital wallets as well as a variety of payment and withdrawal methods including cards, e-wallets, wire, and crypto-wallets.
Always learn from your mistakes. Never accept a total loss. Always evaluate the situation and try to figure out why it happened. Take that experience as an asset for your next move, which will be better because you are know more now than you knew before. We all start off as amateurs, and we have all lost money throughout out trading experience. In his first month of trading, Miles went from $1,000 to $300. I’ve lost a lot by selling at losses inspired by fear. No one is perfect, no one wins every single trade. Don’t let the losses discourage you, because the reality is they’re making you better trader if you choose to learn from them.
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