To perform cryptocurrency arbitrage, you need to find an opportunity where you can buy a cryptocurrency for less than you can sell it on another exchange (minus the fees and commission). Once you’ve found one, all you need to do is simultaneously buy Bitcoin on the lower-priced exchange and sell on the higher-priced one. It’s easy to make hundreds or even thousands of dollars in just a few seconds if you have enough funds.
There are so many hoops to jump through to set up for mining and each coin has its quirks. The power of your machine and graphix card and your power consumption are all important. My friend mined for 8month Eth and only made couple of hundred bucks by time you subtract power useage etc. He already had a powerful machine used in film industry for video graphix just sitting around so he thought he’d put it to use over that time for a laugh and see what happened. It took many hours messing around to set up and occassionally nursing it over that period. Of course he had to use his machine also occassionally which compromised the performance.
The motivation for the investors is that the token will be traded from day one on the exchanges and would yield a nice profit to the ICO participants. In recent years, there have been many successful ICOs, both the project itself and especially in measuring the yield for investors. Coins doubled, or tripled, their value and much more in relation to their value on the crowd sale. Augur’s preliminary crowd-sale (we reported on it previously here) yielded investors a phenomenal 1,000% for their investment. Okay, but what’s the catch here? Not all the projects benefit their investors. Many ICOs proved to be complete scams, not only were they not being traded at all but some projects disappeared with the money and we have not heard from them right up to this day.
The other major risk to be aware of is that hackers are always looking for vulnerabilities to exploit. One example is the more than $30 million worth of Tether coins that were stolen. The most surefire way to ensure the safety of your coins is by using a hardware wallet such as these by Ledger. Keep in mind that this will slow down your ability to trade those coins, as you will be transferring them between the device and your exchange accounts (more on wallets and exchanges soon).

You could try this instead: Be sure to watch an exchange’s order book to better understand the actual prices you can get for the amount of cryptocurrency you’re trading. Consider breaking your order into smaller pieces to get a better price, or use a trading algorithm that lets you execute your larger order as a stealth order at the top of the order book.
So it comes as no surprise that this new generation are exhibiting all the same traits and mistakes that sucked the previous generation of new investors and generations before them through the financial wood chipper. Now a funny event in the last few days made me think running over some classic errors of judgement for this new generation might have some benefit.

Another thing I need to make clear is the type of trading I do - day trading. My base currency is Bitcoin, which I use to buy Altcoins like Ethereum, ZCash, Golem, etc. When I make a trade to buy an Altcoin with BTC, I could end up selling the Altcoin back for BTC within a matter of minutes or hours. All of my profits are converted back into BTC at the end of each trading day.
The second reason to buy the most liquid coins is that there are risks of scams. When you purchase Bitcoin you are sure that you will be able to sell it to somebody later. However, when you buy X coin, which is not as liquid and as popular as Bitcoin is, your risks are higher as everything depends in this case on the project, its team, goals, roadmap, background etc.
Don’t FOMO. This is a spot that people most frequently lose money on. A dash of manipulation, two tablespoons of media hype, a cup of CME and CBOE announcements, and a generous handful of FOMO drove Bitcoin prices from $10,000 to $20,000 in December. Since that time, Bitcoin fell to a low of $9,000 and is currently sitting at around $11,000. It’s easy to look back and say, “if only I waited one month, then I could’ve bought at $9,000 instead of waiting for Bitcoin to hit $20,000 again for me to break even.” But the reality is, the combination of 1) being greedy, 2) investing blindly, and 3) FOMO were likely large contributors to the purchase at an all-time-high. Even in the crazy world of cryptocurrency, if a coin pumps that quickly, it will correct — it’s a matter of time. Speculative pumps are almost always followed by dips. While trying to jump onto a train going full speed sounds like something straight out of a James Bond movie, I’m sure most of us can agree we would probably save some limbs if we just waited for it at the next stop.
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