For any significant investment in the space, I’m using the pick-and-shovel strategy to gain crypto exposure in the portfolio. Which “play” am I investing in? After much research and networking and grovelling, I’ve finally found a very good target which is ironically, a mining operation. I’ve been looking for an exchange play but haven’t found one yet…(so if any of you know of a solid one looking for funding, feel free to lob it my way :-))
In this complex chart, you can see the current Bitcoin prices in the upper third. The green lines indicate a rising price, red lines indicate a falling price. The thin blue threads above and below the candle-shaped price indicators are the Bollinger Band. If the candle touches the top, then the value is “overbought” and will likely fall. If it touches the bottom, then the value is “oversold” and will likely fall.
A lot of people in the markets love tips. Ignore them, they will lead you astray. All information is incomplete, all trends can reverse at any time, don’t listen to tips, don’t take advice, don’t believe you are right, or that someone else knows anything. Instead, soak up every shred of information you can and filter it down and try to make sense of it. If it doesn’t make sense then leave that investment alone. Stock markets, commodity markets, crypto markets, they will all strip you bare if you let yourself be lead. If you are not ready to go it alone, then don’t go at all.

Great guide, however, I would suggest one small edit. Instead of recommending Google Authenticator, use Authy instead, it supports google authenticator 2FA and the biggest drawback with Google Authenticator is if you lose your phone, it breaks or gets stolen you won’t be able to log back into binance unless you wrote down the secret key that binance provided whilst enabling 2FA.


If you have an account on Poloniex.com or Bittrex.com (and other crypto exchange sites) you can use their API with TabTrader to easily trade and monitor prices on your phone. It's important to me that the app connects to Poloniex and Bittrex because these exchanges have good volume. And they're pretty credible. TabTrader supports other major exchanges too :)
Arbitrage trading can be described as the simultaneous purchase and sale of an asset in order to profit from discrepancies in its price. In other words, arbitrage traders will purchase an asset in one market, and then sell that same asset at a higher price in another market. In the context of the cryptocurrency market, arbitrage trading might resemble something like this:
We will see Lightning Network dramatically increase adoption in 2018. That being said, it’s really hard to predict development cycles and we could see Lightning Network growing slowly this year and only hit its stride in 2019/2020. I predict currency coins that do not adopt Lightning Network will lose market share to Bitcoin. BCH, Dash, Pivx appear particularly vulnerable.
Wallets are a good example of this. Many cryptocurrency storage solutions — for example, hardware wallets like the Trezor and Ledger — are designed with maximum security in mind (with good reason!). But these aren’t meant to be used with day trading: the amount of time it takes to sign and confirm transactions from wallets can delay trades that you’re trying to perfectly time.
Use small buy-ins, and don’t margin trade or short unless you know your stuff. The smaller your bet is compared to your total investable funds, the less risk you are taking on every bet (one of many insanely important things we are covering here). Putting it all on black is tempting, but then if it comes up red, you have nothing left to invest. Live to fight another day by learning to manage your buy-in size. As a rule of thumb invest 1% or less per buy-in (yes, that small, really; losing 100% of 1% leaves you with 99%, losing 1% of 100% leaves you with 99%. Small bids offer the same bet, but with way less risk). Put reward aside and practice risk management and capital preservation until you are very experienced (and thus, by logical extension: don’t margin trade or short unless you know what you are doing, as those leveraged bets magnify your risk by their very nature). See Kelly criterion.

Let’s say a trader has bought Bitcoin for almost $20,000 in December 2017. The current price of this crypto is around $7,000-$8,000. It is evident that he has made a mistake purchasing Bitcoin at its tops. Why do many beginner traders do those mistakes? The main reason for this is lack of knowledge and some typical emotions that make them buying when the price grows.
We know firsthand what it’s like to kick yourself over trades that haven’t worked or worked spectacularly yet not have the desired position size. All you can do is live in the now, the past is over. After all, hindsight is 20-20. It would’ve been nice to go all in when Bitcoin was $600 a year ago and cash out on a high return, but that’s not how it works. Imagine if you bought in 2013 when Bitcoin was 1,000, panicked when it dropped to 200 then sold? Imagine that sting. Hindsight is 20-20, we can’t predict the future. Learn from past successes and failures and apply it moving forward. Here are some tips, in our experience, for new cyrptocurrency investors.
Always learn from your mistakes. Never accept a total loss. Always evaluate the situation and try to figure out why it happened. Take that experience as an asset for your next move, which will be better because you are know more now than you knew before. We all start off as amateurs, and we have all lost money throughout out trading experience. In his first month of trading, Miles went from $1,000 to $300. I’ve lost a lot by selling at losses inspired by fear. No one is perfect, no one wins every single trade. Don’t let the losses discourage you, because the reality is they’re making you better trader if you choose to learn from them.
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