I wrote the following simple guide to investing in Bitcoin and Crypto Assets back in Jan '17. After publishing version 3 of my strategy I felt a need to review and update it to reflect any changes in my approach, but upon review, I found very little needed changing. If you are new to Crypto, take your time to read this and the strategy, if you have any questions then feel free to get in touch, and I will do my best to get back to you.
What are Confirmations? How to Time the Bottom of a Market Super Simple Bitcoin Explanation What Does “HODL” Mean? The Top Cryptocurrencies That Aren’t Bitcoin The Ethereum Classic Investment Trust (ETCG) Explained How to Short Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies What is “Alt Season?” How to Buy Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies (Simple) What are Sats?
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Investing isn’t poker or rather it should not be a gambling game. If you go all in with investing in an asset or two, you are almost certain to lose everything, it is just a law of probabilities. Diversify. Do not believe anyone who tells you otherwise, ever. Of course this new generation’s first instinct is to go all in and then when a correction or crash sets in, they lose everything. They then go away and never come back. It’s a never-ending cycle.
Bitcoin continued to find support at the bottom of the cloud and used it as a springboard to break back above the cloud. However, the lagging span, after breaking back above price, has reversed direction and seems to be moving back down while the Tekan Sen continues to trend below the Kijun. Price so far seems to be finding support at the Kijun and the top of the ...
Don’t go downloading random wallets or clicking on random links, but do accept that you have to share information with exchanges. There is some malware out there, and you need to do research and be careful. However, for all you want to protect your privacy, you have to share your info with exchanges you want to use. So share what you have to and download apps as needed, but be careful and do research.
You could try this instead: Be sure to watch an exchange’s order book to better understand the actual prices you can get for the amount of cryptocurrency you’re trading. Consider breaking your order into smaller pieces to get a better price, or use a trading algorithm that lets you execute your larger order as a stealth order at the top of the order book.

To stress some points made above, realize that a diverse portfolio and investment strategy will eat into gains as often as it staves off losses. The only way to make big profits most of the time is to make risky moves. If you go all in on a single coin at a given price and it goes up, that is a payday. If it goes down, your investable funds are locked into that crypto (unless you want to sell at a loss). Diverse strategies protect against this, but they will also eat into your potential gains (as it is rare for everything to go up or down at once). Know what you are looking for and know how to weight your portfolio to reflect that.

Take a look at the screenshot. You can see there candlestick chart. In the upper part of the chart, you can choose indicators and different graphic tools. As for indicators, there are many useful algorithms including the most popular Bollinger Bands, ADX, ATR and the others. Graphic tools are represented by different types of lines and other geometric patterns. Here you can find Fibonacci retracement as well.


Bull markets, bear markets, corrections, and bot manipulations.  All part of the cryptocurrency trading world that has gotten people so interested in trading crypto and being part of the game that’s sure to change the investing world forever.  These new markets are right now looking for new investors, but how to invest if you are a beginner?  Here are some cryptocurrency trading strategy tips.
Now that you’re well-versed about the types of crypto exchange platforms available in the markets, you might think it’s time for you to get started with the investments. Not yet though! Like stock exchange and money trading, crypto trading is not a piece of cake. You need to learn the basics, gather all the necessary information, and get prepared before ultimately heading towards investments. Here’s a list of things to check before finalising an exchange:
The cryptocurrency market is a difficult environment to navigate. Its volatility can be a boon for some and a curse for others. However, what is clear is that there are a variety of trading strategies that one can employ to try and ‘beat the market’. Regardless of the strategy that one chooses to utilize, one must acknowledge the risk that comes with trading in this market. As such, it is important to not invest more than one is willing to lose, and also to make sure that thorough research is always performed before executing any trade.

When you are choosing the crypto exchange, look at and compare cryptocurrency platform fees, among other things. Using some crypto exchanges you will pay a percentage of each deal, using other ones you will pay for income and outcome transactions. You need to pick what fits you more. For example, Bitfinex charges Maker 0.1% and Taker 0.2% in fees based on the volume. Kraken charges Maker 0.16% and Taker 0.26%. European BitBay charges both types at 0.43%. You can see and compare fees schedules here.

All of those statements are false. I live in the US. I have the Binance app (there is a very simple tutorial on the couple of extra clicks required for ios, if you click on the link in the post above. And Tab Trader works just fine in the US as well if you set it up properly. There are tons of tutorials and videos that will walk you through it. If you aren’t willing to put in the time and effort to figure it out, that’s fine. But just because you can’t figure it out, doesn’t mean it doesn’t work just fine.

Swing trading concerns individuals that hold a cryptocurrency over a set period of time, usually a few days or weeks. Swing traders will then attempt to determine the overall trend of their cryptocurrency holding and execute trades based on its overall upward or downward trend. The success of swing trading is largely dependent on an individual’s ability to time the market, which is an extremely difficult feat to achieve given just how quickly the cryptocurrency market can turn. Thus, swing trading is no doubt one of the more riskier trading strategies to pursue.
Limits orders allow us to place an order at a specific price. We can specify the amount of coin that we want to buy or sell, at the price that we want this to happen at. You may have noticed that the order book is always full of sell orders that are a little higher than the current price and buy orders that are a little lower. The advantage with limit orders is that we can do do the same with our orders. The disadvantage is that our transaction likely will not be filled immediately and will count on the market price to make its way towards us.
The second reason to buy the most liquid coins is that there are risks of scams. When you purchase Bitcoin you are sure that you will be able to sell it to somebody later. However, when you buy X coin, which is not as liquid and as popular as Bitcoin is, your risks are higher as everything depends in this case on the project, its team, goals, roadmap, background etc.
The other major risk to be aware of is that hackers are always looking for vulnerabilities to exploit. One example is the more than $30 million worth of Tether coins that were stolen. The most surefire way to ensure the safety of your coins is by using a hardware wallet such as these by Ledger. Keep in mind that this will slow down your ability to trade those coins, as you will be transferring them between the device and your exchange accounts (more on wallets and exchanges soon).

Use small buy-ins, and don’t margin trade or short unless you know your stuff. The smaller your bet is compared to your total investable funds, the less risk you are taking on every bet (one of many insanely important things we are covering here). Putting it all on black is tempting, but then if it comes up red, you have nothing left to invest. Live to fight another day by learning to manage your buy-in size. As a rule of thumb invest 1% or less per buy-in (yes, that small, really; losing 100% of 1% leaves you with 99%, losing 1% of 100% leaves you with 99%. Small bids offer the same bet, but with way less risk). Put reward aside and practice risk management and capital preservation until you are very experienced (and thus, by logical extension: don’t margin trade or short unless you know what you are doing, as those leveraged bets magnify your risk by their very nature). See Kelly criterion.
Fundamental analysis is a methodology that was first conceived by the late American Investor, Benjamin Graham. It was then later popularized by Warren Buffet, currently one of the world’s more famous value investors. Fundamental analysis is a concept that is most often applied to companies, but it can just as easily apply to digital assets such as Bitcoin. Instead of metrics such as the P/E ratio, factors such as the following can be used as part of any cryptocurrency related fundamentals analysis:
ICOs, as you may have guessed, are much like IPOs. This is where coins are offered for the first time to the public. ICOs are not offered through exchanges, but rather you buy them directly from the creators of the project. Usually (it’s different for each project) you will send them Bitcoin or Ethereum that they will use to fund their project; in turn you receive a certain amount of their new coin.
On June 25, 2018, the Financial Services Regulatory Authority (FSRA) of the international financial center in Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Global Market, set out new guidelines to regulate crypto assets. The guidelines cover exchanges, intermediaries, and all others who participate in the crypto space. Crypto Assets are Commodities, not Securities The collective regulatory framework to administer crypto activities in the…

Finally, always check, double check and triple check while trading – a simple tip that even seasoned crypto holders forget. When setting up buy or sell orders, make sure your numbers add up, as even the smallest of typos can see you lose an eye-watering amount. Also, when dealing with an exchange, make sure you’re sending coins to the correct address.
I am not your guru. I’m a crypto enthusiast, not a professional trader, and I make plenty of mistakes. There are a huge amount of ‘gurus’ and ‘experts’ out there but the truth is that many of them haven’t got a fucking clue what they are talking about. Opinions in cryptocurrency are like assholes, everybody’s got one. It’s extremely easy to predict the market and hell, everybody seems like an expert, when cryptocurrency is experiencing a bull run.
We cannot say when you have lost a trade in cryptocurrency trading. If you’re not careful when it comes to cryptocurrency trading, you could find yourself gambling more than you’re trading, and eventually you might lose everything you’ve invested. Never invest more money than you are willing to lose. You should consider any money you put into a trade as lost.
The fight over whether bitcoin’s currency code should be BTC or XBT is ongoing (as of November 2017). When bitcoin was first introduced, BTC became both the abbreviation for bitcoin and its currency code. As bitcoin gained momentum and recognition, a large portion of the community asked for a better currency code that adheres to the International Standards Organization’s rules on cryptocurrency codes, mainly that currencies not associated with a specific country should start with the letter X, hence XBT.
EDIT: #10 Bonus (Suggested by @kerstenwirth ) — always check the ticker symbol. Ticker symbols are not universal, and may vary from exchange to exchange in rare cases. Those cases, though, can come back to bite you. For example, Bitcoin Cash trades on some exchanges as BCH, while it trades on others as BCC. BCC is also the ticker symbol for BitConnect, which was recently outted as a Ponzi Scheme. If you bought BCC under the impression was Bitcoin Cash, you would’ve lost a lot of money.
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