On cryptocurrency mining: As noted, one way to invest in cryptocurrency is via cryptocurrency mining. That is a valid way to start investing if say you love computer gaming and need a new rig and want to invest in small amounts of cryptocurrency while maybe making back some of the cost of the rig (and maybe even breaking even) but that is an entirely different subject. The average investor will want to trade USD for cryptocurrency on an exchange and avoid the complexities and investments of mining. In all cases, unless you already have a good rig with a great graphics card, you’ll need to put down USD upfront anyway.
It is important investors realize not all exchanges and brokers that offer delivery of the underlying Bitcoin are created equal. Some firms have fallen victim to theft by hackers who have stolen Bitcoin belonging to clients whose money was held at the exchanges. Meanwhile, other Bitcoin exchanges have gone bankrupt (as in the case of Mt. Gox),  as a result of fraud or mismanagement.

Long/Short – These are basic jargons that are being used in the trading world. When a trader is in a “Long” trade this means that they have bought something and are hoping that the price will go up to make a profit. On the other hand, when a trader is doing “Short” trades this means that the trader sells what they have in hand. Why would you want to sell a perfectly fine position (crypto)? Profit is made if you can buy for a cheaper price after you have sold it for a much higher one.
Bitcoin continued to find support at the bottom of the cloud and used it as a springboard to break back above the cloud. However, the lagging span, after breaking back above price, has reversed direction and seems to be moving back down while the Tekan Sen continues to trend below the Kijun. Price so far seems to be finding support at the Kijun and the top of the ...
You could try this instead: Develop your own day trading strategy with indicators and rules that you understand and hold yourself to. Then read the news, but read it with a grain of salt — and try not to make trading decisions based on rumors that might be debunked the very next day. You shouldn’t buy just because you see the price rise and fear missing out.
Think of this as your guide to day trading cryptocurrency and you’ll avoid most of the hurdles many traders fall down at. When choosing your broker and platform, consider ease of use, security and their fee structure. There are a number of strategies you can use for trading cryptocurrency in 2017. Whichever one you opt for, make sure technical analysis and the news play important roles. Finally, keep aware of regional differences in rules and taxes, you don’t want to lose profit to unforeseen regulations.
On cryptocurrency mining: As noted, one way to invest in cryptocurrency is via cryptocurrency mining. That is a valid way to start investing if say you love computer gaming and need a new rig and want to invest in small amounts of cryptocurrency while maybe making back some of the cost of the rig (and maybe even breaking even) but that is an entirely different subject. The average investor will want to trade USD for cryptocurrency on an exchange and avoid the complexities and investments of mining. In all cases, unless you already have a good rig with a great graphics card, you’ll need to put down USD upfront anyway.
Consider setting stop orders after you buy. Did I really just wait to point #37 to commit a whole tip to stops?! They are super important for everything except maybe building a long position over time. A stop order will create a market order when a price is hit. This means stop orders are subject to slippage and fees, but this also means you can calculate your risk. As a very general rule of thumb, one might want to ladder stops when not at a computer to protect their investment. Sure, crypto markets are thin (low volume), and that means prices could dip and eat all your stops (super depressing when this happens). However, most of the time we don’t get very deep and temporary dips, and thus most of the time stops will work as intended and simply save your investment in the case of a downturn. I.e., use stops, but be careful and understand the risks.
Learn Technical Analysis. Technical Analysis (TA) is the analyzing of price and volume data and trying to predict future trends based on that. If you know how to read a chart, you’ll be better able to understand how things like candles, moving averages, RSI, and the order book can clue you into good spots to buy and sell. Crypto defies logic all the time, but basic indicators are still helpful to understand. TIP: You don’t have to be good at TA, you can just follow others who are. Fibonacci support and resistance levels, moving averages (try 12, 26, 9 MACD on 4hr candles), RSI, and a few other popular indicators are vital to wrap your head around. All the pros use these, and all the big players have bots who run strategies based on these (complex versions of these at least). You can’t afford to ignore TA if you are going to trade crypto and not just invest in it. I suggest you get familiar with tradingview.com ASAP. See a basic TA strategy.

Lots of traders use bots (you might want to as well if you have the chops). To the next point, lots of traders use trading bots. Some are white hat; some will try to get you to make bad trades. Keep an eye out for bots. If you are using a bot, be careful, there are bots designed to exploit poorly programmed bots. In general, if you don’t have a solid grasp of TA and crypto trading, skip the bot. They are only as useful as the strategies they run.


Cheap fees and fast exchanges. For each trade, the exchange platform you’re using will take a small percentage as commission for the service it’s providing. This is inevitable. Where cryptocurrency trades differ from their fiat currency equivalent is in the size of this fee. Because the fees for transferring cryptocurrencies (typically via wallet payments) are cheaper than credit card and bank transfer fees, cryptocurrency-trading fees are cheaper than forex-trading fees.
As I mentioned before, the Binance exchange fees are really very reasonable and Binance charges just 0.1% on the value of a trade which is less than many of the other popular cryptocurrency trading exchange platforms. It’s free to deposit coins into Binance and you can even cut the trading fees in half if you pay with Binance’s very own coin – The Binance coin. This is probably only worth doing if you are trading tens of thousands of dollars worth of crypto at a time.

These are what allow us to buy and sell cryptocurrencies. There are a handful of popular crypto exchanges, some of them have advantages over others. For example, some exchanges don’t allow us to deposit and withdraw using fiat currency like the U.S. dollar and euro; others aren’t available in certain countries. In this guide we will focus on two very popular exchanges, GDAX and Poloniex. GDAX gives us the ability to use our fiat currency to buy Bitcoin. Poloniex does not, but does give us a wide array of altcoins to trade. There, we’ll be using major coins like Bitcoin and Ethereum to buy the altcoins, and vice versa. Other popular exchanges such as Kraken and Bittrex offer even more coins.
In other words, buy low and sell high via an exchange using limit orders, dollar cost average, set stops if you aren’t in front of a computer, ladder buy and sell orders, use TA, manage risk, preserve capital, watch out for scams, know the tax implications, and consider being conservative in general and not spending your life savings on digital assets.
The only apps that can do trades right now are the mobile apps for the various exchanges. And to view the market and coins available, the most popular site/app is Coin Market Cap. But there really isn't one that can handle everything for you. Which is why I'm currently building out an app called Matrix Portfolio, that will help you automatically pull in your trades from exchanges, so you don't have to manually enter them. As well as allow you to discover all the coins, and offer trading insights as well. Feel free to pre-register for the beta here: http://matrixportfolio.com
I think the simplest place to buy, sell, and store coins is Coinbase (and our tutorial below will help you get set up with that), but you can only buy, sell, and store Bitcoin, Ethereum, Litecoin, and Bitcoin Cash on Coinbase. If you are serious about trading cryptocurrency, you’ll need another exchange like Coinbase’s GDAX, Bittrex, Binance, or Kraken (and you’ll likely want to find a wallet to store your coins in). See a top 5 list of cryptocurrency exchanges and the Best Bitcoin Exchanges ranked (those above are my picks).

Bitbuy.ca is a Canadian owned and operated digital currency platform. Originally founded as InstaBT in 2013, the company’s mission is to provide convenient, dependable and secure access to Bitcoin and other digital currencies. Customer service, ease of use, and quick turnaround times for deposits and withdrawals are pillars of this platform. They cater to beginners as well as experienced traders, and are one of Canada’s quickest growing buy/sell platforms. A great choice for users looking to buy and hold crypto, or users looking for a reliable on-ramp to turn their fiat into crypto quickly and easily.
Congrats @nicolasvh and the team at Opus Labs - this has to be one of the top hunt's of the year IMHO. I'm heavy into crypto HODLing, trading and watching and have tried EVERY crypto tracker available for iOS. It's pretty simple; no trackers come close to Blockfolio, until now. Delta is the first app that has seriously challenged Blockfolio. Even if the team doesn't grow the feature set, it is hands-down better than Blockfolio, both in UI and functionality. Add that to the upcoming features that Nicolas mentions in the last paragraph of his intro and this app is OFF THE CHARTS!

There are many groups on Facebook where you can find likeminded folks who will happily talk crypto all day but the problem is that 99% of these groups are filled with people who have only a very basic understanding of cryptocurrency and the knowledge available here is not particularly strong. I have recently left almost every single group on Facebook as, in my opinion, they are largely filled with FUD.

EDIT: #10 Bonus (Suggested by @kerstenwirth ) — always check the ticker symbol. Ticker symbols are not universal, and may vary from exchange to exchange in rare cases. Those cases, though, can come back to bite you. For example, Bitcoin Cash trades on some exchanges as BCH, while it trades on others as BCC. BCC is also the ticker symbol for BitConnect, which was recently outted as a Ponzi Scheme. If you bought BCC under the impression was Bitcoin Cash, you would’ve lost a lot of money.

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