You could try this instead: Be sure to watch an exchange’s order book to better understand the actual prices you can get for the amount of cryptocurrency you’re trading. Consider breaking your order into smaller pieces to get a better price, or use a trading algorithm that lets you execute your larger order as a stealth order at the top of the order book.
Mean reversion is where the investor assumes that the price of a coin will remain at an average price level over time.  Upward trends, and downwards trends, are expected to revert back to the average over the long haul. This means you need to know the charts well and be able to figure out what the average price for the cryptocurrency you intend to trade in. When the coins are less than the estimated average that is when one wants to make a few purchases. When the price is higher than the average it is expected to drop back down to the mean price and that would be the time to sell.  Of course, figuring out just when to sell is the trick, and that is where the gamble comes in.
The problem with this approach is that once you sell, you’ve actually lost money (you don’t lose until you sell), and while in some cases, cutting your losses does make sense, most coins will bounce back in days, if not hours, and then the same people, seeing a surge, buy back at higher prices, only to repeat the cycle. Buying high and selling low is a one-way ticket to going broke.
Crypto exchanges no longer serve a small community of early adopters, but an entire market of crypto enthusiasts that just can’t get the level of service they are looking for when trying to exchange cryptocurrencies. Introduced by the same people who brought AAATrade to the world of CFDs, CryptoExchange is a relatively young cryptocurrency exchange that has gained popularity among crypto enthusiasts these days. The platform aims to resolve the hassle associated with the slow approval process and poor customer support that characterizes traditional exchanges.
Speaking of the last two points, realize that crypto tends to be pattern based and tends to go in cycles. See “the cryptocurrency rotation” and “market cycles” for an in-depth look at what this means. You want to be in a coin before it starts its rotation, and then laddering out as its rotation ends. Likewise, in a perfect world you want to be in for the bull part of a market cycle, and out for the bear part. Near impossible to spot these trends in advance, but with experience you should be able to spot them as they occur and manage your positions accordingly.
Cryptocurrency. Lack of regulation is its biggest appeal. However, that may change, given a recent call for regulating this segment. Though it is a big hit with investors, especially because of the record run of Bitcoin, the most popular of all the digital currencies, there have been skeptics crying foul over the legitimacy of this investment class.
Don’t be greedy. No one ever lost money taking a profit. As a coin begins to grow, the greed inside us grows along with it. If a coin increases by 30%, why not consider taking profit? Even if goals are set to 40% or 50%, you should at least pull out some of the profit on the way up in case a coin doesn’t reach the goal. If you wait too long or try to get out at a higher point, you risk losing profit you already earned or even turning that profit into a loss. Get into the habit of taking profits and scouting for re-entry if you want to continue reaping potential profits.
×