Arbitrage is the process of buying then immediately selling something for a profit. This is possible when there are price differences between different marketplaces. For example, buying certain DVDs at your local store for $10 only to sell them online for $20 each, doubling your money in the process. In our case, it’s buying cryptocurrency on one exchange and then immediately selling it at another. Arbitrage is based on exploiting market inefficiencies and is popular in all kinds of markets, including the stock and FOREX markets.
Crypto exchanges no longer serve a small community of early adopters, but an entire market of crypto enthusiasts that just can’t get the level of service they are looking for when trying to exchange cryptocurrencies. Introduced by the same people who brought AAATrade to the world of CFDs, CryptoExchange is a relatively young cryptocurrency exchange that has gained popularity among crypto enthusiasts these days. The platform aims to resolve the hassle associated with the slow approval process and poor customer support that characterizes traditional exchanges.
If you think a trend will continue for a while, or if it’s too hard to predict when the price will change direction, following the trend is a more risk averse strategy. With this strategy, you trade with the trend rather than with the swings. If the market is trending up, only open long trades. If the market is falling, you only open short trades. Trend followers start trading after a trend has been established, and they exit when the trend changes. This is also called “Position Trading.”
Hey, Will, I like this! Thanx for the info. I’m somewhat new to cryptos but not to investing — my Dad invested in the stock market since I was a kid and as an adult I was a registered investment advisor representative for a large US institution. One conclusion I’ve come to is that the skills and approach for crypto investing are no different than those for the stock market. I use the same strategies and analyses I use for stocks and etf’s and feel completely at home in the crypto market. Yes, I deal with more brokerage accounts, etc., but the principles are the same.
When Bitcoin forks into a new cryptocurrency… everyone gets free coins. When Bitcoin Cash was created, everyone holding BTC got 1 Cash for every BTC they had. Next time Bitcoin forks this will be true again. NOTE: Forks can be confusing; if you aren’t in the fork for the capture date (which isn’t always clear) you don’t get the free coins. DO NOT CHASE FREE COINS (see next point).
On top of that, the cryptocurrency market travels at lightspeed compared to other markets. New coins enter the market on a daily basis (in 2016, there were about 550 different coins, today there are about 1,500), and each one has news every day. I’m not doubting your ability to consume and analyze news, but that level of information bombardment will always be more effectively consumed as a group. In these communities, you’ll see members link news and relevant articles about coins you’ve invested in and coins you’ve never heard of. The community will definitely expand your knowledge much faster than doing it all yourself.
Maybe you remember when, thanks to The Wall Street Journal, everyone thought the SEC was going to meet on May 7th to decide whether or not Ethereum (ETH) was a security. If you had taken up a large position in ETH prior to the 7th, you would have been disappointed when the price fell from ~$793 USD to ~$743 USD amidst news that there actually was no meeting after all.

The term “day trading” suggests manically executing on trades every few minutes. But, as many of these mistakes show, day trading success doesn’t necessarily come for finding a new potential trade every second: you might find more success simply by taking your time, finding opportunities you’re fairly confident in, and executing a couple of trades every day or two.
NOTE: Once you have Coinbase down, try moving onto GDAX. It’s, in overly simple terms, like a better version of Coinbase with lower fees. Coinbase operates both platforms, and both use the same logins. GDAX is the preferred exchange of many Bitcoin traders in the U.S. It caters to both pros and novices. After you master that, then consider exchanges like Bittrex and Binance.
This marketplace is widely known within the cryptocurrency community and I would tell that this is true as you hardly can find a trader who heard nothing about it. Moreover, several famous and popular tabloids like Forbes, Coindesk, Reuters have mentioned Bitstamp in their articles. The company has established cooperation with Ripple, CACEIS and Swissquote.

I came across Bibox around December when looking for an alternative to Binance. This one at a glance looked like inspired by Binance but with more features and many new coins. Bibox app is also pretty smart and you can use it to trade smartly from your smartphone. One thing that Bibox is doing better than Binance is charting. If you already use the Binance mobile app, then you should try Bibox to see how it is different than Binance.
When buying coins, and especially with Bitcoin, you will notice that your purchase is in decimal. A Bitcoin itself is relatively expensive, around $10,000 at the moment (as of 15th Feb '18). If you were to purchase say $5,000 of Bitcoin, you would at today's rate be purchasing around 0.5 of Bitcoin. Do not ever worry about this; Bitcoin operates at eight decimals places. You do not need to own a whole Bitcoin or any coin for that matter. Consider it like pence in the pound or cents in the dollar, but with more decimal places.

The motivation for the investors is that the token will be traded from day one on the exchanges and would yield a nice profit to the ICO participants. In recent years, there have been many successful ICOs, both the project itself and especially in measuring the yield for investors. Coins doubled, or tripled, their value and much more in relation to their value on the crowd sale. Augur’s preliminary crowd-sale (we reported on it previously here) yielded investors a phenomenal 1,000% for their investment. Okay, but what’s the catch here? Not all the projects benefit their investors. Many ICOs proved to be complete scams, not only were they not being traded at all but some projects disappeared with the money and we have not heard from them right up to this day.
The problem with this approach is that once you sell, you’ve actually lost money (you don’t lose until you sell), and while in some cases, cutting your losses does make sense, most coins will bounce back in days, if not hours, and then the same people, seeing a surge, buy back at higher prices, only to repeat the cycle. Buying high and selling low is a one-way ticket to going broke.

If you have an account on Poloniex.com or Bittrex.com (and other crypto exchange sites) you can use their API with TabTrader to easily trade and monitor prices on your phone. It's important to me that the app connects to Poloniex and Bittrex because these exchanges have good volume. And they're pretty credible. TabTrader supports other major exchanges too :)


You’ll find that different exchanges cater to different markets. Today, most countries have at least one cryptocurrency exchange specializing in their own currency. There are exchanges that can accept New Zealand Dollars in exchange for bitcoin, for example. Other exchanges are known for certain pairs. Bithumb, for example, has particularly strong liquidity in the ETH/KRW (South Korean Won) pair at the moment (and it’s easily the most popular cryptocurrency exchange in Korea).
Investors need to be more selective with presales and ICOs in 2018. Not only will most ICOs fail but if you’re not getting in during the presale, you’ve already lost. If half the tokens were sold for $1 during the presale, and the ICO price is $3, who wins when the coins hit a major exchange? While you might still turn a profit by buying at the ICO price, those who purchased at presale have a much better risk/reward profile.
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So I decided to take a peek at github, here's what I saw 11,200 repositories for bitcoin vs 3,563 for ethereum. **for non technical folks - repositories are where developers are storing code for projects** However, you have to note that Bitcoin was released in January 2009 and Ethereum was released in July 2015. Total volume isn't the best measure, let's take a look at the languages used.
We've had splits in the technical community before. Two years ago, Angular was the dominant Javascript framework and React was new with a small following. Angular's community split between Angular 1 and 2. Today, there are 236,472 repo's associated with React compared 247,335 for both angular variants. Alone, interest in react is about to supercede both variants of Angular combined.
EDIT: #10 Bonus (Suggested by @kerstenwirth ) — always check the ticker symbol. Ticker symbols are not universal, and may vary from exchange to exchange in rare cases. Those cases, though, can come back to bite you. For example, Bitcoin Cash trades on some exchanges as BCH, while it trades on others as BCC. BCC is also the ticker symbol for BitConnect, which was recently outted as a Ponzi Scheme. If you bought BCC under the impression was Bitcoin Cash, you would’ve lost a lot of money.
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