Many governments are unsure of what to class cryptocurrencies as, currency or property. The U.S in 2014 introduced cryptocurrency trading rules that mean digital currencies will fall under the umbrella of property. Traders will then be classed as investors and will have to conform to complex reporting requirements. Details of which can be found by heading to the IRS notice 2014-21.
It’s human nature to be cautious at first and then progressively relaxed, even reckless. My observations suggest that it is best to behave in the opposite, counter-intuitive way: commit yourself to the market with reckless abandon in the early days, and then start the scaling out process, applying the brakes and get the hell out when it appears to be the later stages.
When you are choosing the crypto exchange, look at and compare cryptocurrency platform fees, among other things. Using some crypto exchanges you will pay a percentage of each deal, using other ones you will pay for income and outcome transactions. You need to pick what fits you more. For example, Bitfinex charges Maker 0.1% and Taker 0.2% in fees based on the volume. Kraken charges Maker 0.16% and Taker 0.26%. European BitBay charges both types at 0.43%. You can see and compare fees schedules here.
OmiseGO (OMG) is a public financial technology that’s based on Ethereum. The concept of OMG is to enable peer-to-peer value exchange and payment service in real time across not only decentralized currencies but fiat money as well. OmiseGO allows anyone on its network to process financial transactions (payrolls, B2B, remittances, payments, etc.) in a much more inexpensive and decentralized manner.
If you’re only buying Bitcoin, Ether and other currencies in order to sell them at a profit a short time later, then the investment is turning into speculation. You can trade the different tokens on a digital currency exchange (which are designed for trading fiat money for crypt currencies) or a crypto currency exchange (crypto for crypto). There are dozens of different exchanges that we’ll describe in detail in the guide.
Keeping up to speed with the news on Cointelegraph, seeking independent ratings on ICOs, and gathering as much information as you can on a coin’s background are essential steps before you decide to make an investment. After making a purchase, monitor any changes in price closely – and consider setting higher and upper limits on when you would want to sell your crypto, mitigating losses in the event of a crash and protecting profits after a surge.
If you are going long, consider building an average position (for example via dollar cost averaging or value averaging). There is no better way to avoid making a poorly timed trade than buying incrementally instead of all at once and thereby buying an asset at its “average” price over time. If you don’t have a really solid grasp of technical indicators and the way the volatile crypto markets work, consider averaging out of positions as well. Averaging isn’t just financially conservative, it is important psychologically. Taking too big of a position at once can be emotionally difficult to deal with (and can thus lead to bad decision making) given the historic volatility of the cryptocurrency market.

So how do you know if you should invest in an ICO? It’s not about science, it is important to pay attention to the level of seriousness of the project and its team. Look for the project’s website (does it look like a child has built it during computer school?), Who is the team behind the project – Are they hiding behind nicknames or proudly present themselves on their website? Pay attention to the Bitcointalk thread (does it exist at all?) and how the team members respond to technical questions. Is there a large community behind the project? Expect to see a Slack gathering its community. Watch out the amount raised: A project which had raised too little will probably will not be able to develop over time, a project which had raised huge amount – there won’t be enough investors left out there to buy coins on exchanges. And most importantly is risk management. Never put all eggs in one basket and invest too much of your portfolio in one ICO.


 Major Altcoins have the most volume traded again the USD. Thus, analyzing graphs of those Altcoins should be done whilst comparing them to their Bitcoin graph and their dollar value graph. Here on CryptoPotato we make sure we do that for our weekly market reports. If we were solely analyzing the Bitcoin value chart, we would surely miss the accumulation period of Ethereum by roughly $300 (recall $300 of Bitcoin accumulation back in 2015?). At the time of writing Ethereum is trading a month later, for more than $1000 for one Ether.
There are a number of tools you can use to maximize profits and minimize risks, such as margin trading, leverage, and stop-loss orders. Shorting Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies can be done in a variety of ways. Just looking at the Bitcoin price chart for early 2018, you can see that those that spotted the downward trend in mid January and made a short trade would have made 40% profits by exiting one month later.
Take profits. Some investors think “taking profits” is a dirty phrase, but it is a rather conservative strategy none-the-less. Taking profits can result in you making less money than you would have if you did nothing and just “let it ride”… but that is only true if Bitcoin goes up over the long term. If you have hefty profits, consider taking them off the table, and then waiting for a lower price in the future. Worst case, you can buy back in at a higher price later (leaving some potential profits on the table). TIP: If a coin just went up 400%… consider taking some profits. Cryptocurrency almost always corrects at some point after a big run. I personally would say HODLing after making 400% gains is called GREED. I won’t ever sell my full stack in one chunk, but I’m going to start averaging out when the MACD turns bearish after a 400% – 1,000% run if the run was somewhat organic. If the run was the result of a pump and dump, then I will likely take it all off the table quickly. Pump and dumps are frustrating events, like I said, watch out for manipulation.

Learn the lingo. BTC is the symbol for Bitcoin. Bitcoin is a type of cryptocurrency. An altcoin is a coin that isn’t Bitcoin (like Ether). Limits, stops, exchanges, shorting, forks, ICOs, margin trading, etc (search for any of those on our site). It is way easier to invest and trade if you understand the common terms used. It is also easier to make friends in crypto groups if you know investing lingo and basic memes like “hodl.”

If you’re only buying Bitcoin, Ether and other currencies in order to sell them at a profit a short time later, then the investment is turning into speculation. You can trade the different tokens on a digital currency exchange (which are designed for trading fiat money for crypt currencies) or a crypto currency exchange (crypto for crypto). There are dozens of different exchanges that we’ll describe in detail in the guide.
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