You could try this instead: You could try to avoid times where you know there’ll be relatively less liquidity in crypto — like nights and weekends — by closing out all of your positions every night and over the weekend. You might also consider maximizing the liquidity to which you have access by trading on a platform that allows you to access many different exchanges at once, rather than trading on only one or two specific exchanges.
Don’t invest blindy. There are people in this world who would sell a blind person a pair of glasses if they could make money. Those same people play in the cryptocurrency markets and use every opportunity to exploit less-informed investors. They’ll tell you what to buy or claim certain coins will moon, just to increase the prices so they can exit. Due to the highly speculative nature of the cryptocurrency markets today, a good investor will always do his or her own research in order to take full responsibility for the potential investment outcome. Information coming from even the best investor is, at best, great information, but never a promise, so you can still get burned.
For myself, and most crypto traders, the goal is to increase the amount of Bitcoin we own. I don’t care about the US dollar, at least not directly. When I look at the price of a cryptocurrency, I look at it in terms of BTC. For example, right now the price of 1 ETH (Ethereum) is 0.049 BTC. My trades are based on that price, not the fact that 1 ETH is $304.
 Major Altcoins have the most volume traded again the USD. Thus, analyzing graphs of those Altcoins should be done whilst comparing them to their Bitcoin graph and their dollar value graph. Here on CryptoPotato we make sure we do that for our weekly market reports. If we were solely analyzing the Bitcoin value chart, we would surely miss the accumulation period of Ethereum by roughly $300 (recall $300 of Bitcoin accumulation back in 2015?). At the time of writing Ethereum is trading a month later, for more than $1000 for one Ether.
Investors need to be more selective with presales and ICOs in 2018. Not only will most ICOs fail but if you’re not getting in during the presale, you’ve already lost. If half the tokens were sold for $1 during the presale, and the ICO price is $3, who wins when the coins hit a major exchange? While you might still turn a profit by buying at the ICO price, those who purchased at presale have a much better risk/reward profile.
Bitcoin faced extreme headwinds in March when Alphabet's Google (ticker: GOOG, GOOGL) joined Facebook (FB) in banning ads for cryptocurrencies, which lowered liquidity in the market. In an abrupt reversal, Facebook said on June 26 that it would allow some ads for cryptocurrencies, but continues its ban against initial coin offerings and binary options.
Always learn from your mistakes. Never accept a total loss. Always evaluate the situation and try to figure out why it happened. Take that experience as an asset for your next move, which will be better because you are know more now than you knew before. We all start off as amateurs, and we have all lost money throughout out trading experience. In his first month of trading, Miles went from $1,000 to $300. I’ve lost a lot by selling at losses inspired by fear. No one is perfect, no one wins every single trade. Don’t let the losses discourage you, because the reality is they’re making you better trader if you choose to learn from them.
An unbreakable rule in trading says that you should never involve your emotions in trading. This is a basic rule for anyone who trades over any term, but especially for the ones who trade for the short term. Imagine buying Bitcoin according to the DCA strategy: Let’s say the Bitcoin price had crashed by 40% in three days. Now what? Obviously it is the time to buy a second portion of the coin (according to DCA) and average the initial trading entry price. But instead, almost everyone I know got “cold feet” exactly at the “terrifying” moment of decrease and had not completed the purchase of the second share. Why does it happen to us? One word – emotion. Emotions, in this case – fear of loss, affects us and completely disturbs our plan of action. If you are one of those (yes, the majority) who won’t buy the second share in the example above – you should consider your future as a trader, a crypto trader in particular. Getting over your emotions is also important after an unsuccessful trade or after you have sold a coin which is sky rocketing just after you sold it (FOMO). To sum up, don’t regret profit you’ve missed and don’t feel guilty about lost trades. Set yourselves a plan of action together with a set of goals, and act accordingly – as if you were a pre-programmed computer. Human beings are not rational creatures.

I came across Bibox around December when looking for an alternative to Binance. This one at a glance looked like inspired by Binance but with more features and many new coins. Bibox app is also pretty smart and you can use it to trade smartly from your smartphone. One thing that Bibox is doing better than Binance is charting. If you already use the Binance mobile app, then you should try Bibox to see how it is different than Binance.
You’ll find that different exchanges cater to different markets. Today, most countries have at least one cryptocurrency exchange specializing in their own currency. There are exchanges that can accept New Zealand Dollars in exchange for bitcoin, for example. Other exchanges are known for certain pairs. Bithumb, for example, has particularly strong liquidity in the ETH/KRW (South Korean Won) pair at the moment (and it’s easily the most popular cryptocurrency exchange in Korea).
Although I profited, I wasn’t sure if I just had a lucky month. I wanted to formalize my trading knowledge so I could do more than buy low and sell high. There had to be a real strategy to this stuff. I read as many books as I could on trading stocks and foreign exchange markets. I made a lot of mistakes. But eventually I found my rhythm and strategies.
Now, of course, you will want to do your due diligence and make sure that you know what the market conditions are first, and what the previous price levels have been when trying to predict the appropriate time to get out. Knowing when to get out is the most important thing about this type of strategy. So, apparently, timing is everything here, and the more you know the better off you will be when judging for the appropriate times to buy or sell so that you have the greatest opportunity for the biggest profit.
Expect Price Spikes, Expect Corrections, Be Patient, and Stick to a Strategy: Cryptocurrency tends to make big moves in its price and volume. It is easy to get FOMO (fear of missing out) and buy high, and it is easy to get overwhelmed by FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) and sell. If you miss a price jump, it isn’t necessarily time to go all-in in an emotionally charged panic. Instead wait patiently for the price to settle (which could take weeks or months) or average in or out slowly. Taking gains after the price goes way up, or making a buy after the price goes way down makes sense. Panic buying after the price just went way up, or panic selling after it went way down is rarely the right move.
In this complex chart, you can see the current Bitcoin prices in the upper third. The green lines indicate a rising price, red lines indicate a falling price. The thin blue threads above and below the candle-shaped price indicators are the Bollinger Band. If the candle touches the top, then the value is “overbought” and will likely fall. If it touches the bottom, then the value is “oversold” and will likely fall.
×