So how do you know if you should invest in an ICO? It’s not about science, it is important to pay attention to the level of seriousness of the project and its team. Look for the project’s website (does it look like a child has built it during computer school?), Who is the team behind the project – Are they hiding behind nicknames or proudly present themselves on their website? Pay attention to the Bitcointalk thread (does it exist at all?) and how the team members respond to technical questions. Is there a large community behind the project? Expect to see a Slack gathering its community. Watch out the amount raised: A project which had raised too little will probably will not be able to develop over time, a project which had raised huge amount – there won’t be enough investors left out there to buy coins on exchanges. And most importantly is risk management. Never put all eggs in one basket and invest too much of your portfolio in one ICO.

As you know, the focus of this guide is all about trading cryptocurrencies, but there are other ways to get a hand in the pot. Some people choose to buy a cryptocurrency and forget about it, much like you would do with some stock in say, Amazon. Other’s are actually investing through the stock market via the Bitcoin Investment Trust (GBTC). If you are a firm believer in the future of Bitcoin, both are perfectly fine ways to go about it.
Hey Jhon, I haven’t found a crypto yet that is really related to my hobbies – Crossfit and backpacking – but I would actually advise steering clear of investing in things linked too closely to what you’re passionate about; whilst insider knowledge of an industry is really valuable, it’s important to trade without emotion and if your trading a coin that is linked to a great love of yours, that becomes harder.
All of those statements are false. I live in the US. I have the Binance app (there is a very simple tutorial on the couple of extra clicks required for ios, if you click on the link in the post above. And Tab Trader works just fine in the US as well if you set it up properly. There are tons of tutorials and videos that will walk you through it. If you aren’t willing to put in the time and effort to figure it out, that’s fine. But just because you can’t figure it out, doesn’t mean it doesn’t work just fine.

Remember, cryptocurrency is volatile! There is always the chance that the market will crash. Cryptocurrency isn’t a centrally controlled and regulated fiat currency. Even though blockchain is connected with a feeling of security for most people, a 2-factor authentication is used, if you lose a coin or someone cheats you, there is still nothing you can do about it.
For example, if it was thought that things were getting very frothy, and most of the people who were getting in were just gamblers who were buying on credit, then that might be the time to cut loose using that as your signal rather than using a technical one.  On the other side, if you have cryptocurrency that is just hammered to the floor with everyone thinking it’s dead and everyone’s out of it, one can use this opportunity to make a few purchases as a long-term investment and wait for the upturn.

So I decided to take a peek at github, here's what I saw 11,200 repositories for bitcoin vs 3,563 for ethereum. **for non technical folks - repositories are where developers are storing code for projects** However, you have to note that Bitcoin was released in January 2009 and Ethereum was released in July 2015. Total volume isn't the best measure, let's take a look at the languages used.


What makes the platform appealing is the easy process of opening an account and getting verified. It also provides users with the options of dealing in ample amount of crypto pairs with ultra-security features. Another noteworthy point here is that the platform offers 15+ free & automatically generated digital wallets as well as a variety of payment and withdrawal methods including cards, e-wallets, wire, and crypto-wallets.
Expect Price Spikes, Expect Corrections, Be Patient, and Stick to a Strategy: Cryptocurrency tends to make big moves in its price and volume. It is easy to get FOMO (fear of missing out) and buy high, and it is easy to get overwhelmed by FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) and sell. If you miss a price jump, it isn’t necessarily time to go all-in in an emotionally charged panic. Instead wait patiently for the price to settle (which could take weeks or months) or average in or out slowly. Taking gains after the price goes way up, or making a buy after the price goes way down makes sense. Panic buying after the price just went way up, or panic selling after it went way down is rarely the right move.
We cannot say when you have lost a trade in cryptocurrency trading. If you’re not careful when it comes to cryptocurrency trading, you could find yourself gambling more than you’re trading, and eventually you might lose everything you’ve invested. Never invest more money than you are willing to lose. You should consider any money you put into a trade as lost.
Risk Warning: Trading forex, cryptocurrencies, indices, and commodities are potentially high risk and may not be suitable for all investors. The high level of leverage can work both for and against traders. Before any investment in forex, cryptocurrencies, indices, and commodities you need to carefully consider your targets, previous experience, and risk level. Trading may result in the loss of your money, therefore, you should not invest capital that you cannot afford to lose.
This is one of the most important cryptocurrency tips. By looking at the number of wallets vs the number of active wallets and the current trading volume, you can attempt to give a specific currency a current value. You can then make informed decisions based on today’s market price. The more accurate your predictions, the greater your chances for profit.
Dollar cost averaging one’s purchases of Bitcoin reduces risk in sudden changes. This reduces the sting of or sudden pricing changes, reducing reliance on a single point of entry. By increasing your Bitcoin investment over time, you reduce the desire to buy or sell often. If there’s anything we’ve learned from the long run is that Bitcoin is here to stay (knock on wood). Stick to your gut, but don’t ignore others.
While these rules are by no means the only lessons you need, they’re definitely a great starting point. Sometimes, though, things are easier said than done, such as watching your portfolio value plummet and still having the iron willpower of resisting the sell button. One of the best solutions I’ve found to this was to join a community of like-minded cryptocurrency investors. Educated and smart crypto-traders, as well as the community members, will all be there to support your efforts and will be holding with you in the rough times.
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