Know thy taxes. Speaking of legal tender like the USD, it is what you use to pay taxes. If you don’t understand Bitcoin’s tax implications, brush up on them before you start power trading. One could get them into a situation where they make money on paper, but end the year down in Bitcoin without taking their loss, and thus end up owing a bunch of money they don’t have in taxes. Those who don’t have investment experience can get in trouble if they don’t understand the somewhat complex implications of trading crypto.
The problem with this approach is that once you sell, you’ve actually lost money (you don’t lose until you sell), and while in some cases, cutting your losses does make sense, most coins will bounce back in days, if not hours, and then the same people, seeing a surge, buy back at higher prices, only to repeat the cycle. Buying high and selling low is a one-way ticket to going broke.
In the beginning when I was shooting for 20% gains on a trade and not knowing what to look for, I worked a lot more. Not only that but I also let my emotions control my trades. For example, I once purchased Stratis after the price dropped massively. My assumption was that on such a sharp decrease in price, it had to rebound eventually. I was wrong. The price kept diving. I had to hold the currency for 2 weeks just to secure a 35% loss instead of an 85% loss. I was constantly tuned into that chart waiting for an opportunity to sell back to Bitcoin.
No one actually knows how long this whole crypto thing will last but instead of losing sleep at night constantly checking token prices which have zero fundamentals behind them, I’d much rather invest in a real business that will make money whether Bitcoin prices go up or down. (Full disclosure: To satisfy my own curiosity, I do own a tiny amount of Bitcoin which won’t make me rich nor will it affect me if the whole space goes to zero).

Once you have narrowed down on cryptos with high daily trading volumes, focus on their historical price movements. The best way to do this is to use a financial ratio known as the Sharpe ratio.  Don’t worry about calculating it, since you can easily find it online.  The Sharpe ratio measures the potential return of an asset based on its volatility.  Figures higher than 1 are usually a sign of an asset with high potential returns. Given that cryptos had a stellar year in 2017, most of them have a Sharpe ratio of higher than 1.  Therefore, for you to make use of this ratio, narrow down on cryptos that have the highest Sharpe ratio relative to the rest of the market to Profitable Cryptocurrency Trading
And remember, you don’t have to buy a whole coin — you can buy fractions of coins. The top coins are expensive, so consider buying fractions of a coin to start if you don’t have a big bankroll. It has historically been a mistake to buy only ETH and LTC because BTC costs more. You should consider which one is most likely to increase in and retain value.

Another very common mistake beginners make is spending all their trading money in one go. If you find a good entry, you should buy in with a percentage of your funds (50% - 60%) and hold the rest to see whether your entry works. This way, even if a coin drops following your purchase, you can average it down by buying more at the dip. Similarly, if the uptrend continues, you can always buy more, and even though this approach reduces your profit margins, it secures your position and prevents you from being all-in on a trade that goes south.
Don’t invest blindy. There are people in this world who would sell a blind person a pair of glasses if they could make money. Those same people play in the cryptocurrency markets and use every opportunity to exploit less-informed investors. They’ll tell you what to buy or claim certain coins will moon, just to increase the prices so they can exit. Due to the highly speculative nature of the cryptocurrency markets today, a good investor will always do his or her own research in order to take full responsibility for the potential investment outcome. Information coming from even the best investor is, at best, great information, but never a promise, so you can still get burned.
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