What are Confirmations? How to Time the Bottom of a Market Super Simple Bitcoin Explanation What Does “HODL” Mean? The Top Cryptocurrencies That Aren’t Bitcoin The Ethereum Classic Investment Trust (ETCG) Explained How to Short Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies What is “Alt Season?” How to Buy Bitcoin and Other Cryptocurrencies (Simple) What are Sats?
In contrast to Forex or stock markets, crypto industry have much more risks for traders and investors including scam exchanges, hacker attacks, delisting of tokens and the others. Cryptocurrency market is volatile and coins have no underlying value meaning they may cost either $100,000 or $0 depending on demand and supply. Nobody can predict today the price of Bitcoin for several years.
TIP: The tips and tricks below shouldn’t be mistaken for professional investment advice; instead this is basic friendly advice to mull over. If you want professional investment advice, consult a fiduciary. For a shorter list that zeros in on some key points, see: 5 Tips for New Crypto Traders. See also, how to trade and invest in cryptocurrency and our crypto investing / trading starter kit.
Especially for traders dealing with fairly large amounts, multiple, small entries and exits over a fixed period of time (dollar-cost averaging) can help obtain a good price for an asset over an extended period of time. Consider using time-weighted average price trading: specify n, t, and p such that you buy or sell n of a cryptocurrency over t hours for an average price of p.

Litecoin, like all major altcoins, has depreciated substantially against BTC. This decline has been precipitous and nearly monotonic since May, with even the slightest corrective rally sold off immediately. However, we may find solace in the fact this pair appears to have found footing around 9070, which appears to be a very significant level of support. In the ...
One of the things to know here is that cryptocurrency exchange is not part of the regular stock exchange. They are not the same as Wall Street and its exchanges, although they share same general mechanics. The number of best platforms keeps growing as the market is still forming, here is a top 5 list of cryptocurrency exchanges ranked by trading volume.

Consider Diversifying. With the above advice in mind, there is nothing worse than getting frustrated with BTC, moving to ETH / alts and missing a BTC price spike, then moving back into BTC and missing the ETH spike. This is very easy to do given the rotation, and the natural urge to “FOMO buy.” If you have some of your funds in all the coins you trade, you’ll avoid missing out on a unicorn (a term one can use to describe an odd event, like a giant price spike in a short amount of time). If you diversify, especially when prices are low across the board, you’ll avoid some of the urge to jump into one coin mid or late into a run and out of a coin just before it goes on its run. In other words, although it isn’t the most profitable tactic, diversifying is good for one’s sanity in a number of important ways.


Bitcoin tends to find resistance at whole number points. For example, at $4.8k and $4.85k. It also absolutely loves to react at whole numbers like $10k and either drop or run. If you know you want to take profits soon or buy soon, keep an eye on those whole numbers. If you feel like the run must almost be over, pull your profits before the whole number is reached!

Ripple continues to remain pegged down by this supply zone and the EMAs as it tries to break out from that descending trendline. The lower trendline has been adjusted and we can see that it has tested near it multiple times and is now attempting to break past resistance and make its way back to the FIB level or the supply zone above. MACD seems to be signaling ...
The term “day trading” suggests manically executing on trades every few minutes. But, as many of these mistakes show, day trading success doesn’t necessarily come for finding a new potential trade every second: you might find more success simply by taking your time, finding opportunities you’re fairly confident in, and executing a couple of trades every day or two.
Another very common mistake beginners make is spending all their trading money in one go. If you find a good entry, you should buy in with a percentage of your funds (50% - 60%) and hold the rest to see whether your entry works. This way, even if a coin drops following your purchase, you can average it down by buying more at the dip. Similarly, if the uptrend continues, you can always buy more, and even though this approach reduces your profit margins, it secures your position and prevents you from being all-in on a trade that goes south.
I would also encourage you to have a secure place to keep your passwords, maybe written down in a couple of locations or stored in a password manager, just create something which works for you. Also, keep a copy of your private key for each wallet. If you lose your access and lose your keys, then you lose your coins. Don't worry; this is not necessary with every wallet, for example Coinbase and a Nano S will manage your private keys for you, this will all start to make sense once you start.
The basic idea of this strategy is, “get out until the carnage is over.” When the crypto-market is under fire, non-crypto assets will appreciate in value compared to cryptocurrencies. Moving some of your portfolio over to fiat currencies (or something else) will protect it from a declining cryptocurrency market. This is similar to how investors buy gold as a safe haven in times of stock market turbulence. When the storm is over, you can buy back your assets at a lower price. It’s always a good idea to keep a diversified portfolio.

Use small buy-ins, and don’t margin trade or short unless you know your stuff. The smaller your bet is compared to your total investable funds, the less risk you are taking on every bet (one of many insanely important things we are covering here). Putting it all on black is tempting, but then if it comes up red, you have nothing left to invest. Live to fight another day by learning to manage your buy-in size. As a rule of thumb invest 1% or less per buy-in (yes, that small, really; losing 100% of 1% leaves you with 99%, losing 1% of 100% leaves you with 99%. Small bids offer the same bet, but with way less risk). Put reward aside and practice risk management and capital preservation until you are very experienced (and thus, by logical extension: don’t margin trade or short unless you know what you are doing, as those leveraged bets magnify your risk by their very nature). See Kelly criterion.
Always learn from your mistakes. Never accept a total loss. Always evaluate the situation and try to figure out why it happened. Take that experience as an asset for your next move, which will be better because you are know more now than you knew before. We all start off as amateurs, and we have all lost money throughout out trading experience. In his first month of trading, Miles went from $1,000 to $300. I’ve lost a lot by selling at losses inspired by fear. No one is perfect, no one wins every single trade. Don’t let the losses discourage you, because the reality is they’re making you better trader if you choose to learn from them.
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