I am sorry because I am unable to give you a personal recommendation as we are a comparison website and general information service. Your decision would entirely depend on your needs. You will also need to put in the time to learn how each platform works, where each feature is and how to utilize it. Kindly spend some time with it and continue doing your research. You may find a list of trading platforms on the page you’re viewing. You may click the green “Go to site” button and/or the links for you to read more pertinent information about each option.
You need a trading plan. You can basically consider it to be a blueprint for success. Your plan has to take everything that you can into account like entry and exit of money, risk management, time frame and even position sizing. Without a plan and too much emotion, you will be gambling instead of trading and you will never know how to improve your skills to become better.
Coinbase/GDAX will want more personal information than you’ll feel comfortable giving them; there is no way around this. The more information you give them, ID, Bank account, credit card, etc., the higher your limit and the less restricted your account will be. Don’t let this scare you off from becoming a cryptocurrency investor. Every other exchange user went through this process; you have to also. Since you have to trust someone, Coinbase/GDAX is a good bet.
React to “the Mood of the Market,” But Otherwise Pick a Strategy and Stick With It. The market changes moods, and some strategies are better than others in a given market. So you’ll likely want to evolve your strategy as the market changes, and you learn. However, you’ll also likely want to avoid things like going long for most of the year, but then 9 months into your investment you start day trading when the market is down. Sometimes it can be tempting to change one’s strategy to adjust to the current market (for example if the market is bearish and trading in a tight range), however, this can get you in real trouble if you don’t make very careful moves. A long investor who starts going short will start realizing capital gains and will risk being in fiat if and when there is a recovery (recoveries, like corrections, can come on very quickly and without warning). If you do switch from long to short, make a commitment to yourself to buy back in upon a certain event occurring (like the 5 day EMA crossing the 50 day on 6 hr candles; something like that). I’ve hear countless stories of plans to buy back in, they often end with “but I didn’t,” those are the stories told in bull markets by very sad people.
No, the successful trader is not me. I’ve gotten lucky a few times and I’m still refining and trying out strategies; on the other hand, I’m part of communities of people who trade on a daily basis to grow their portfolios, and while some of the results can be attributed to luck, a majority of it is based on fundamentals, good habits, and experience.
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