Bitcoin has had phenomenal growth in its price and MCap since inception. If we exclude other cryptoassets, Bitcoin has been the best performing asset in the world every year since 2009 through to December 2017 with the exception of 2014. It has beaten all global currencies, equities, commodities, bonds, ETFs, real estate throughout that period. Bubbles are by definition short-lived, they do not keep bubbling for eight years.
There are so many hoops to jump through to set up for mining and each coin has its quirks. The power of your machine and graphix card and your power consumption are all important. My friend mined for 8month Eth and only made couple of hundred bucks by time you subtract power useage etc. He already had a powerful machine used in film industry for video graphix just sitting around so he thought he’d put it to use over that time for a laugh and see what happened. It took many hours messing around to set up and occassionally nursing it over that period. Of course he had to use his machine also occassionally which compromised the performance.
For stock market investors, investing in Bitcoin indirectly through a listed security such as an ETF, ETP, or trust may be suitable for those looking at taking a passive position. Active traders might find the limited trading hours and potential lack of volume a limiting factor that could hinder their trading. Overall, using listed securities that invest, track, or hold Bitcoin can be a viable alternative to diversify away from the risks of margin trading or safeguarding private keys when buying the underlying.
I bought Elastic $XEL at the obscure Heat exchange. It was rather difficult discovering how to buy it because I was in this case ahead of the herd where the path was not well defined. In the end I bought it at a high price (average 31,367 Satoshis, should have got them at 25,000 Sats) as I got scammed over at Heat by a predator (Arsonic @Ars0nic on Twitter) playing the order book. We’ll see how that plays out. I think the excessive price I paid will not matter too much.
There are some people who believe that Bitcoin is the only blockchain based protocol which has value and that all others will fail. These people are known as Bitcoin maximalists and their belief is based on economics, specifically Austrian economics, and that the technology which is great for Bitcoin is not useful for anything else. I am more open minded and believe that there are other applications of the technology which will create sustainable ecosystems but I could be proved wrong here. It is important to spend time doing your own research and building up your own view on where the technology may be used.
I would also encourage you to have a secure place to keep your passwords, maybe written down in a couple of locations or stored in a password manager, just create something which works for you. Also, keep a copy of your private key for each wallet. If you lose your access and lose your keys, then you lose your coins. Don't worry; this is not necessary with every wallet, for example Coinbase and a Nano S will manage your private keys for you, this will all start to make sense once you start.

The cryptocurrency market is a difficult environment to navigate. Its volatility can be a boon for some and a curse for others. However, what is clear is that there are a variety of trading strategies that one can employ to try and ‘beat the market’. Regardless of the strategy that one chooses to utilize, one must acknowledge the risk that comes with trading in this market. As such, it is important to not invest more than one is willing to lose, and also to make sure that thorough research is always performed before executing any trade.
Crypto is really unpredictable. While reaping profits of hundreds of percent, the section withstands now and will continue getting dozens of billions of dollars erased flat out in the future. When Bitcoin loses its value against the US dollar Altcoins usually go through the same process. Simple math shows that even holding a part of the portfolio in Altcoins, such as Ethereum and Litecoin, is usually not enough to avoid getting a big chunk of the portfolio’s USD worth wiped out following a Bitcoin dump.
I would also encourage you to have a secure place to keep your passwords, maybe written down in a couple of locations or stored in a password manager, just create something which works for you. Also, keep a copy of your private key for each wallet. If you lose your access and lose your keys, then you lose your coins. Don't worry; this is not necessary with every wallet, for example Coinbase and a Nano S will manage your private keys for you, this will all start to make sense once you start.
Mean reversion is where the investor assumes that the price of a coin will remain at an average price level over time.  Upward trends, and downwards trends, are expected to revert back to the average over the long haul. This means you need to know the charts well and be able to figure out what the average price for the cryptocurrency you intend to trade in. When the coins are less than the estimated average that is when one wants to make a few purchases. When the price is higher than the average it is expected to drop back down to the mean price and that would be the time to sell.  Of course, figuring out just when to sell is the trick, and that is where the gamble comes in.
On April 12th, 2018, Bitcoin’s (BTC) price jumped over 10% in a single minute. If you’d been properly positioned with a good strategy, you could have made a single trade and increased your position’s value by 10% almost instantly. On the other hand, if you were shooting in the dark and didn’t have a strategy, you could have taken a big hit in 60 seconds.
There are lots of studies about emotion in trading. Fear of missing out, greed, etc. are very common causes for people to make mistakes while trading. No matter how experienced you are, you will eventually be led by emotions and this might make you lose money, so you have to prepare yourself to do it as little as possible and to control yourself better or you will lose more than win.
No, the successful trader is not me. I’ve gotten lucky a few times and I’m still refining and trying out strategies; on the other hand, I’m part of communities of people who trade on a daily basis to grow their portfolios, and while some of the results can be attributed to luck, a majority of it is based on fundamentals, good habits, and experience.
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