Trading strategies have been practiced since the first human civilizations formed. This means that even though we have converted them to our current trading market, the basis of everything is still bartered trade. What are we trying to say here? We’re trying to say that no matter what the strategy is; the main point of following one is to make a profit.
The top of the order book will show you the lowest price at which someone is willing to sell a cryptocurrency, and the highest price at which someone is willing to buy it — but that doesn’t mean you can buy or sell the amount you want at that price. In fact, the amounts of a cryptocurrency that people are offering to buy or sell at the top of the order book are often quite small, which means that, if you’re trying to buy or sell a larger amount, you’ll have to go deeper into the order book: finding a counterparty who’s offering a price that isn’t as good as the “market price.”
Binance is a digital asset exchange service. Basically it’s an online platform that allows people to buy cryptocurrencies using Bitcoin. Learning how to trade on Binance will get you in the cryptocurrency game and give the ability to trade basically any coin on the market. Best of all, unlike some other exchanges, Binance offers a truly staggering number of cryptocurrencies for you to buy and sell so you are very likely to find the coins you are looking for on the Binance platform.

This marketplace is widely known within the cryptocurrency community and I would tell that this is true as you hardly can find a trader who heard nothing about it. Moreover, several famous and popular tabloids like Forbes, Coindesk, Reuters have mentioned Bitstamp in their articles. The company has established cooperation with Ripple, CACEIS and Swissquote.

Trading on low-volume days in the market could incur substantial slippage. People who make trades — especially large trades — on low-volume days often will not find many partners on the other side of the order book willing to make that trade. The result is that they could end up paying much more for the trade than expected, incurring slippage in the process.


Is a digital asset which is designed to act as a medium of exchange that uses encryption to secure transactions and control the creation of new currency units. Cryptocoins are a subset of digital coins. Bitcoin was created in 2009, thus becoming the first decentralised Cryptocoin. It uses cryptography to secure and verify transactions as well as to control the creation of new units of a particular cryptocurrency.

One of the biggest draws to Binance is the super cheap transaction fees. Since Binance are in the startup phase, the fees really are some of the least expensive out there. Binance charge nothing for new deposits of coins onto the platform and just 0.1% on the value of trades. To put this in perspective – if you were to use your Bitcoin to buy $100 of Ethereum, Binance would charge you 10 cents.
An unbreakable rule in trading says that you should never involve your emotions in trading. This is a basic rule for anyone who trades over any term, but especially for the ones who trade for the short term. Imagine buying Bitcoin according to the DCA strategy: Let’s say the Bitcoin price had crashed by 40% in three days. Now what? Obviously it is the time to buy a second portion of the coin (according to DCA) and average the initial trading entry price. But instead, almost everyone I know got “cold feet” exactly at the “terrifying” moment of decrease and had not completed the purchase of the second share. Why does it happen to us? One word – emotion. Emotions, in this case – fear of loss, affects us and completely disturbs our plan of action. If you are one of those (yes, the majority) who won’t buy the second share in the example above – you should consider your future as a trader, a crypto trader in particular. Getting over your emotions is also important after an unsuccessful trade or after you have sold a coin which is sky rocketing just after you sold it (FOMO). To sum up, don’t regret profit you’ve missed and don’t feel guilty about lost trades. Set yourselves a plan of action together with a set of goals, and act accordingly – as if you were a pre-programmed computer. Human beings are not rational creatures.
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A “manageable amount” is obviously subjective and will vary for each person based on things such as time available to dedicate to trading. Feel free to do your own research to find the right exchange for you. I tend to value user experience of an exchange over the amount of coins on it. Ultimately, what exchanges you use is going to depend on your own personal preferences. GDAX and Poloniex will provide sufficient resources needed to be a successful trader, so they are definitely a good place to start.
Daniel Defoe, the author of Robinson Crusoe, wrote a pamphlet in 1719, “The Anatomy of Exchange Alley or, a system of stock jobbing. Proving that scandalous trade, as it is now carry'd on, to be knavish in its private practice, and treason in its publick.” Does the sentiment sound familiar? I have republished some books from the turn of the 19th century with a preface saying basically, “Do you notice the stock market is basically unchanged even after more than a 100 years of historical turmoil?” The scams and attitudes of the market and its participants are still so recognizable after over 100 years you are left to wonder if the billions spent on compliance on the worlds bourses are not a complete waste of money.
In the beginning when I was shooting for 20% gains on a trade and not knowing what to look for, I worked a lot more. Not only that but I also let my emotions control my trades. For example, I once purchased Stratis after the price dropped massively. My assumption was that on such a sharp decrease in price, it had to rebound eventually. I was wrong. The price kept diving. I had to hold the currency for 2 weeks just to secure a 35% loss instead of an 85% loss. I was constantly tuned into that chart waiting for an opportunity to sell back to Bitcoin.
(BTW, don’t you love the price predictions on Bitcoin that pundits come up with from time to time? Talk about a wide price and time spread. And they are always disclaimed with something like “these predictions should be taken with a grain of salt” and “do your own research” and “this is no way constitutes investment advice”. Imagine if there was a “sell side analyst” job in crypto. Talk about a great gig…)
On June 25, 2018, the Financial Services Regulatory Authority (FSRA) of the international financial center in Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi Global Market, set out new guidelines to regulate crypto assets. The guidelines cover exchanges, intermediaries, and all others who participate in the crypto space. Crypto Assets are Commodities, not Securities The collective regulatory framework to administer crypto activities in the…
Don’t FOMO. This is a spot that people most frequently lose money on. A dash of manipulation, two tablespoons of media hype, a cup of CME and CBOE announcements, and a generous handful of FOMO drove Bitcoin prices from $10,000 to $20,000 in December. Since that time, Bitcoin fell to a low of $9,000 and is currently sitting at around $11,000. It’s easy to look back and say, “if only I waited one month, then I could’ve bought at $9,000 instead of waiting for Bitcoin to hit $20,000 again for me to break even.” But the reality is, the combination of 1) being greedy, 2) investing blindly, and 3) FOMO were likely large contributors to the purchase at an all-time-high. Even in the crazy world of cryptocurrency, if a coin pumps that quickly, it will correct — it’s a matter of time. Speculative pumps are almost always followed by dips. While trying to jump onto a train going full speed sounds like something straight out of a James Bond movie, I’m sure most of us can agree we would probably save some limbs if we just waited for it at the next stop.
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