For stock market investors, investing in Bitcoin indirectly through a listed security such as an ETF, ETP, or trust may be suitable for those looking at taking a passive position. Active traders might find the limited trading hours and potential lack of volume a limiting factor that could hinder their trading. Overall, using listed securities that invest, track, or hold Bitcoin can be a viable alternative to diversify away from the risks of margin trading or safeguarding private keys when buying the underlying.

The second one is Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds. This investment classic, written in 1841, is the best book ever written on market psychology and will explain everything you need to know about just why cryptocurrencies have captured the imagination of the investing public. While it’s a long book, you only need to read three chapters: John Law's Mississipi Scheme, the South Sea Bubble, and Tulipomania.
For any significant investment in the space, I’m using the pick-and-shovel strategy to gain crypto exposure in the portfolio. Which “play” am I investing in? After much research and networking and grovelling, I’ve finally found a very good target which is ironically, a mining operation. I’ve been looking for an exchange play but haven’t found one yet…(so if any of you know of a solid one looking for funding, feel free to lob it my way :-))
You do not need to right away choose the first exchange option you see on Google search. Take your time to research as different crypto exchange platforms available in the market vary from each other in terms of functionality and style of trading they offer. To save your time, I’ve listed below the different types of cryptocurrency exchange platforms that’ll help you get a better idea:
Categorize your investments and look at the long picture. In the process of your research, you’ll eventually realize you’re coming across a few different categories of coins. For some of them, you believe they have good teams, great vision, amazing publicity and a track record for successful execution. Great! Put these into medium or long-term holds and let them marinate into a delicious tenderloin. When the price dips, don’t even consider panic selling because anything in your medium or long-term portfolio should remain untouched for a set amount of time. BNB is a good example of a coin Miles considers a long hold. Recently, it dipped 20% for a while, and within our community, we witnessed some sell-offs to preserve investments. A week later, it jumped up almost 3x for a period of time.
AvaTrade offers phone support and allows deposits and withdrawals through multiple avenues such as credit/debit card, wire transfer, e-payments, etc. The firm claims one-click functionality for buying Bitcoin or Bitcoin cash on its MT4 platform. Meanwhile, Plus500 does not have phone support, and instead, services clients through live chat and e-mail. Markets.com assists through in-platform live support and 24/5 help center.
So I decided to take a peek at github, here's what I saw 11,200 repositories for bitcoin vs 3,563 for ethereum. **for non technical folks - repositories are where developers are storing code for projects** However, you have to note that Bitcoin was released in January 2009 and Ethereum was released in July 2015. Total volume isn't the best measure, let's take a look at the languages used.
Long/Short – These are basic jargons that are being used in the trading world. When a trader is in a “Long” trade this means that they have bought something and are hoping that the price will go up to make a profit. On the other hand, when a trader is doing “Short” trades this means that the trader sells what they have in hand. Why would you want to sell a perfectly fine position (crypto)? Profit is made if you can buy for a cheaper price after you have sold it for a much higher one.
Don’t FOMO. This is a spot that people most frequently lose money on. A dash of manipulation, two tablespoons of media hype, a cup of CME and CBOE announcements, and a generous handful of FOMO drove Bitcoin prices from $10,000 to $20,000 in December. Since that time, Bitcoin fell to a low of $9,000 and is currently sitting at around $11,000. It’s easy to look back and say, “if only I waited one month, then I could’ve bought at $9,000 instead of waiting for Bitcoin to hit $20,000 again for me to break even.” But the reality is, the combination of 1) being greedy, 2) investing blindly, and 3) FOMO were likely large contributors to the purchase at an all-time-high. Even in the crazy world of cryptocurrency, if a coin pumps that quickly, it will correct — it’s a matter of time. Speculative pumps are almost always followed by dips. While trying to jump onto a train going full speed sounds like something straight out of a James Bond movie, I’m sure most of us can agree we would probably save some limbs if we just waited for it at the next stop.
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