Suppose you’re watching BTC’s chart and notice multiple Doji candlesticks, a classic indicator of indecision in the market. You have a feeling from a few other indicators that the price is about to rise, so you buy more Bitcoin — but alas, the indecision swings the other way, and you’ve lost money (but hopefully not that much, since you’re placing stop-loss orders!).


Binance is a digital asset exchange service. Basically it’s an online platform that allows people to buy cryptocurrencies using Bitcoin. Learning how to trade on Binance will get you in the cryptocurrency game and give the ability to trade basically any coin on the market. Best of all, unlike some other exchanges, Binance offers a truly staggering number of cryptocurrencies for you to buy and sell so you are very likely to find the coins you are looking for on the Binance platform.
Long/Short – These are basic jargons that are being used in the trading world. When a trader is in a “Long” trade this means that they have bought something and are hoping that the price will go up to make a profit. On the other hand, when a trader is doing “Short” trades this means that the trader sells what they have in hand. Why would you want to sell a perfectly fine position (crypto)? Profit is made if you can buy for a cheaper price after you have sold it for a much higher one.
Another very common mistake beginners make is spending all their trading money in one go. If you find a good entry, you should buy in with a percentage of your funds (50% - 60%) and hold the rest to see whether your entry works. This way, even if a coin drops following your purchase, you can average it down by buying more at the dip. Similarly, if the uptrend continues, you can always buy more, and even though this approach reduces your profit margins, it secures your position and prevents you from being all-in on a trade that goes south.

Swing Trading Strategy – Swing trading is somewhere in the middle of Day Trading and Trend Trading. This is because Day Trading is holding an asset from a couple of seconds to a few hours but never more than a day. Trend Trading, on the other hand, is when the trader looks for a longer timetable and keeps the asset between weeks to months. Swing traders hold an asset for a couple of days up to a few weeks.
This may seem like a silly question but am I able to buy and sell any and all cryptocurrency on the apps you listed? I wish I had seen this article a lil sooner…when searching for an app I read nothing but great things about coinbase. But it’s terrible. Fees are absurd, I can only buy (haven’t sold any thing yet bc I’ll incur more fees when I do so I’m waiting til its REALLY worth cashing in) 5 cryptos, and I can only get alerts for 3 of those 5. It’s awful. I want to be able to but whats looking good without having to pay crazy flat fees PLUS surcharges and international fees. It cost me $3 every time I buy…but I will divide my money up for the day to keep buying as it drops lower. So if I have $500 to put it, I’ll buy $100…if it drops I’ll buy another $100 and so on. But that will cost me $15 just to buy it. Is there an app that allows purchases for ALL cryptos with low fees????

We did it! We made it through all the fundamentals needed to start trading cryptocurrency. I think you might agree that each individual concept on it’s own is not terribly complicated. You might even be thinking: “This sounds really easy! I’m going to be a millionaire by Christmas!” It’s great to be ambitious about getting started, but slow your roll. It’s going to take some work to put all of these concepts together, and the only way to do it is to start trading.
Volatility. It is perhaps the singular word that best encapsulates the cryptocurrency market and how people look at it. For crypto skeptics, volatility is their indicator to stay clear of risk. However, for crypto enthusiasts, volatility is the number one sign that faster and more meaningful returns are close at hand. Indeed, both of these groups of people are correct,…
We are still seeing the bulls grind EMA 4 hour support, but they have to break the lower highs to see continuation and shift momentum. The bears continue to hold the upper paw as long as the lower highs remain. The daily chart continues to tighten and this weekend it will be worth watching other alt coins in daily equilibriums to see if we have any initial ...
In 2015 and the beginning of 2016, when Bitcoin held solid – as solid as Bitcoin can be – shuffling around $300 per one BTC, the game was trading Altcoins in order to gain more Bitcoin. It was expected that Bitcoin would grow higher in the future (the Pygmalion effect). Having a rather volatile base asset, such as Bitcoin, raises our need to compare our portfolio performance both in terms of its Bitcoin’s value and its dollar’s value. Many traders decreased the number of Bitcoin they are holding during the past year (hey, and it wasn’t hard when Ethereum got cut 70% from its Bitcoin all-time high…) although it had a nice dollar yield. Bitcoin’s growth made a lot of money for the crypto market, causing its total market cap to increase 30 times during the last year! As traders, it is important to keep Bitcoin as your base asset, but also not to forget the dollar value, and to take profit sometimes. You should always see the bigger picture – crypto is only one tier of your investment options. There are also the stock markets, real estate, bonds and many more investment opportunities. It is important to spread the risks among the crypto portfolio, as well as in the whole household investment portfolio.
Forks are nice, but they aren’t worth losing money over. 1 Bitcoin Cash is worth about $330 as of today in Oct 2017. 1 Bitcoin costs about $4.8k. If it cost you hundreds in losses to get a single Bitcoin Cash, it probably wasn’t worth it. In other words, don’t let excitement or fear of a fork mess with your general strategy too much. The best example of the worst that can happen with a fork is Zclassic. This event was really sad. Let is serve as a reminder of how brutal crypto can be and why chasing a fork sometimes just ins’t worth it.
TIP: A good first foray into cryptocurrency investing is the obvious, buying a major cryptocurrency like Bitcoin. After that, you’ll probably want to trade USD for crypto on an exchange like GDAX. Once you have done that, you could try trading BTC and ETH for other cryptocurrencies. Trading “crypto pairs” can be rewarding, but it is more complex and often more risky than just buying a single cryptocurrency as an investment.
The first thing you need to do before you invest in a crypto is to analyze its trading volumes. As a rule, always go for cryptos that have high daily trading volumes, unless there are some big upcoming news about a low volume crypto. High volumes signal to a Crypto’s liquidity, and the presence of an active community. The problem with low volume cryptos is that in most cases, they lack a strong community backing them, and they can easily get delisted from exchanges, leading to losses.
Don’t be greedy. No one ever lost money taking a profit. As a coin begins to grow, the greed inside us grows along with it. If a coin increases by 30%, why not consider taking profit? Even if goals are set to 40% or 50%, you should at least pull out some of the profit on the way up in case a coin doesn’t reach the goal. If you wait too long or try to get out at a higher point, you risk losing profit you already earned or even turning that profit into a loss. Get into the habit of taking profits and scouting for re-entry if you want to continue reaping potential profits.
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