Embrace volatility – Cryptocurrencies are famously volatile. The price of Bitcoin, for example, went from $3,000 down to $2,000 and then leapt up to nearly $5,000, all within three months in 2017. Whilst this means risk is high, it also means the potential for profit is great too. It’s always sensible to check the volatility of the exchange you decide to go with.

All of those statements are false. I live in the US. I have the Binance app (there is a very simple tutorial on the couple of extra clicks required for ios, if you click on the link in the post above. And Tab Trader works just fine in the US as well if you set it up properly. There are tons of tutorials and videos that will walk you through it. If you aren’t willing to put in the time and effort to figure it out, that’s fine. But just because you can’t figure it out, doesn’t mean it doesn’t work just fine.

Bitcoin (BTC) has been engaged in a predictable up and down pattern where it absolutely crashes at the beginning of any year and then sky-rockets as the year nears its end. Bitcoin held steady at around $19,000 in December 2017, and then sure enough – crashed big time to around $6,000 at the beginning of 2018. At the time of writing, March 8th 2018, the price of Bitcoin is relatively stable between $10,000 and $12,000. In my opinion, the price will run again soon.

Continually doing these things can lead one to gradually cultivate a strategy: a collection of signals that one is good at recognizing and that have a consistent track record. Some traders only buy or sell once they see confluence: multiple signals indicating the same oncoming reversal or trend continuation at the same time. For instance, they might look for candlestick patterns indicating a reversal on both a short-time-interval chart (like a 15-minute chart) and on a long-time-interval chart (like a 4-hour chart).


Trading strategies have been practiced since the first human civilizations formed. This means that even though we have converted them to our current trading market, the basis of everything is still bartered trade. What are we trying to say here? We’re trying to say that no matter what the strategy is; the main point of following one is to make a profit.
Real trading strategies should be based on quantifiable specifications that can be analyzed based on historical data that can be used for future trading scenes. Finding the right strategy to help traders earn more is actually the first step of the ladder to success. If you are reading this today and you are looking for strategies to help you out, then you have done the first step. What people fail to realize is that a very good strategy is something that starts before the main planning occurs. Without further delay, let’s get right into that!
How often will you buy or sell? Some people want to be day traders, but we’ve shown that holding could be the best bet. The general rule of thumb is that the longer of a time horizon you plan on holding for the less risk you incur. This rule carries over into the realm of cryptocurrency from stock investing. However, here may be times to simply cut and run. Declines due to unforeseen structural issues are an indicator to cut losses and sell out.
Many litecoin investors followed the wrong herd last December when its founder Charlie Lee sold all of his shares in the company to avoid a conflict of interest. This should have indicated to investors that the price would not hold and would decline, Spatafora says. Instead of selling, many crypto investors bought more litecoin "like idiots when it was not sustainable," he says.
Let’s say on January 2, 2017, you owned $1,000 and exchanged it into euros (EUR) with another market trader at a rate of EUR€0.9565, leaving you with EUR€956.50. Then, on November 24, 2017, the value of the US dollar had fallen from EUR€0.9565 to EUR€0.8380, so you decide to exchange your euros back into US dollars. After finding someone willing to sell their US dollars for your euros, you carry out the exchange at the new price. Your EUR€956.50 is now worth $1,141.40, leaving you with a profit of a little more than 14%.
An additional common mistake is searching for crashed coins, in accordance to their value against the Bitcoin, hoping they will return to their glory prices. So newsflash – there are coins which are light years away from their peak levels. Take Aurora for example; in March 2014 an all-time high price of 0.14 Bitcoin for one Aurora was recorded. As of the time of writing, Aurora trades at a 99.9% discount – 0.00014 Bitcoins. Could the (damned) Aurora make a move upwards 1000x? You’ll never know. You surely can’t assume a coin being lower than its peak price is an opportunity rather than a falling knife. There are also coins which disappeared and slowly got out of continuous trading – a scenario defiantly worth considering (especially with the low-cap and volume altcoins).

I have been following the crypto markets since mid 2017, just in time to witness the incredible surge of the digital asset industry. Fascinated by the potential of blockchain technology I’ve started to dig deeper and that’s how I ended up meeting the Toshi Times team. I hold a Political Science degree, therefore the crypto regulation development is particularly interesting for me. I’m also heavily involved with music, running my own label, a YouTube channel and working with distribution. People call blockchain the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution’ and I believe it will change our daily lives in the coming years and we will have the front row seats to witness it.
EDIT: #10 Bonus (Suggested by @kerstenwirth ) — always check the ticker symbol. Ticker symbols are not universal, and may vary from exchange to exchange in rare cases. Those cases, though, can come back to bite you. For example, Bitcoin Cash trades on some exchanges as BCH, while it trades on others as BCC. BCC is also the ticker symbol for BitConnect, which was recently outted as a Ponzi Scheme. If you bought BCC under the impression was Bitcoin Cash, you would’ve lost a lot of money.
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