On top of that, the cryptocurrency market travels at lightspeed compared to other markets. New coins enter the market on a daily basis (in 2016, there were about 550 different coins, today there are about 1,500), and each one has news every day. I’m not doubting your ability to consume and analyze news, but that level of information bombardment will always be more effectively consumed as a group. In these communities, you’ll see members link news and relevant articles about coins you’ve invested in and coins you’ve never heard of. The community will definitely expand your knowledge much faster than doing it all yourself.

For example, if it was thought that things were getting very frothy, and most of the people who were getting in were just gamblers who were buying on credit, then that might be the time to cut loose using that as your signal rather than using a technical one.  On the other side, if you have cryptocurrency that is just hammered to the floor with everyone thinking it’s dead and everyone’s out of it, one can use this opportunity to make a few purchases as a long-term investment and wait for the upturn.
If you are a big player, keep in mind you can distort the price (thus, you might actually want to margin trade… or like, spot trade and help us lift the market 😀 ). Volume is decent on any given crypto exchange, but this isn’t like trading the S&P. If you are playing with 50BTC, and you try to buy or sell that much at once, you can distort the market temporarily. When you watch buy and sell orders in an exchange, you’ll notice that when sells ball up the price tends to drop and when buys ball up the price tends to go up. If you try to buy or sell too hard, you can drag the price up or down a little. If you have insanely deep pockets, you can accidentally be dipping your toes in at-best-grey-area behavior. It is much better etiquette to buy and sell in amounts that are average for the book you are buying on. When a high-level investor buys ten billion worth of a stock or sells, they do it in chunks (to avoid dropping or spiking the price of the asset). TIP: Also watch out for shady people pumping or dumping a coin by doing this. What looks like a lot of buyers could be one person or a group messing with the price. The lack of regulation is a blessing and a curse with crypto, as is the relatively low volume compared to other asset types.
So-called “hot wallets” make accessing your crypto easy – allowing you to transfer funds and complete trades quickly and with ease. Many providers now offer mobile apps so this can be done on the move. Meanwhile, “cold wallets” are stored offline – commonly on USB sticks – with some people even writing down their private keys on paper. The latter can work well if you’re looking to save crypto for a rainy day.

I have been using Coindex for a long time now and am constantly impressed by the time and care Josh and Cellaflora put into the project. There is an emphasis on perfection and testing the app's features before release and this has amounted to a polished and irreplaceable part of my iPhone. Coindex will always have a space on my dock and can't wait to see what they add next :)
Only a few cryptocurrencies – such as Bitcoin and Ethereum – have achieved mainstream levels of popularity. However, even well-established currencies can fall victim to extreme price volatility. It can be difficult to predict how prices will fluctuate with newly minted coins because there is little historical information to analyze. Backing a new currency could prove extremely lucrative, but equally, there’s a chance you’ll make an expensive mistake if you don’t know what you’re doing.
There are lots of studies about emotion in trading. Fear of missing out, greed, etc. are very common causes for people to make mistakes while trading. No matter how experienced you are, you will eventually be led by emotions and this might make you lose money, so you have to prepare yourself to do it as little as possible and to control yourself better or you will lose more than win.
Howdy, Welcome to popular Cryptocurrency blog 'CoinSutra'. I'm Harsh Agrawal, a tech enthusiast & Digital nomad from New Delhi, India.I started CoinSutra to help users around the globe to learn about popular Cryptocurrencies.Here at CoinSutra I write about Bitcoin Wallet, Cryptocurrency wallets, Online Privacy & Security, VPN experiences & making money from Crypto.

Bitcoin has had phenomenal growth in its price and MCap since inception. If we exclude other cryptoassets, Bitcoin has been the best performing asset in the world every year since 2009 through to December 2017 with the exception of 2014. It has beaten all global currencies, equities, commodities, bonds, ETFs, real estate throughout that period. Bubbles are by definition short-lived, they do not keep bubbling for eight years.
(BTW, don’t you love the price predictions on Bitcoin that pundits come up with from time to time? Talk about a wide price and time spread. And they are always disclaimed with something like “these predictions should be taken with a grain of salt” and “do your own research” and “this is no way constitutes investment advice”. Imagine if there was a “sell side analyst” job in crypto. Talk about a great gig…)
Take a look at the screenshot. You can see there candlestick chart. In the upper part of the chart, you can choose indicators and different graphic tools. As for indicators, there are many useful algorithms including the most popular Bollinger Bands, ADX, ATR and the others. Graphic tools are represented by different types of lines and other geometric patterns. Here you can find Fibonacci retracement as well.
Technical analysis is the study of past price patterns. This will allow us to identify opportunities for profit. The cryptocurrency market, maybe more than any other market, has a herd mentality. The tendency, especially with inexperienced traders, is to buy when the price is raising, and sell when the price is dropping. We can take advantage of this with technical analysis.

So how do you know if you should invest in an ICO? It’s not about science, it is important to pay attention to the level of seriousness of the project and its team. Look for the project’s website (does it look like a child has built it during computer school?), Who is the team behind the project – Are they hiding behind nicknames or proudly present themselves on their website? Pay attention to the Bitcointalk thread (does it exist at all?) and how the team members respond to technical questions. Is there a large community behind the project? Expect to see a Slack gathering its community. Watch out the amount raised: A project which had raised too little will probably will not be able to develop over time, a project which had raised huge amount – there won’t be enough investors left out there to buy coins on exchanges. And most importantly is risk management. Never put all eggs in one basket and invest too much of your portfolio in one ICO.
Don’t be greedy. No one ever lost money taking a profit. As a coin begins to grow, the greed inside us grows along with it. If a coin increases by 30%, why not consider taking profit? Even if goals are set to 40% or 50%, you should at least pull out some of the profit on the way up in case a coin doesn’t reach the goal. If you wait too long or try to get out at a higher point, you risk losing profit you already earned or even turning that profit into a loss. Get into the habit of taking profits and scouting for re-entry if you want to continue reaping potential profits.
×