Keep a critical perspective on the data that exchanges are providing you: technical analysis is only as good as the data it’s analyzing. When looking at volume numbers, for example, ask yourself: What’s the source of this information? Has it been validated? Could other factors be skewing the number? Beyond just looking at the numbers, it’s important to understand the meaning of those numbers: what they imply, and what biases could be influencing them.


Similar to investing, diversification is king. To lower possible trading risks, it’s better to distribute your money into different cryptocurrencies. While some grow, some will fall and by not putting all your money on single bet you can balance the losses. That said, trading requires research and tracking changes and there are a lot of cryptocurrencies — which means a lot of research. Start with a few and expand slowly.

Speaking of the last two points, realize that crypto tends to be pattern based and tends to go in cycles. See “the cryptocurrency rotation” and “market cycles” for an in-depth look at what this means. You want to be in a coin before it starts its rotation, and then laddering out as its rotation ends. Likewise, in a perfect world you want to be in for the bull part of a market cycle, and out for the bear part. Near impossible to spot these trends in advance, but with experience you should be able to spot them as they occur and manage your positions accordingly.


The cryptocurrency trading platform you sign up for will be where you spend a considerable amount of time each day, so look for one that suits your trading style and needs. Exchanges like Coinbase offer in-depth platforms, such as their Global Digital Asset Exchange (GDAX). It’s always worth setting up a demo account first to make sure the exchange has the technical tools and resources you need.
You’ll find that different exchanges cater to different markets. Today, most countries have at least one cryptocurrency exchange specializing in their own currency. There are exchanges that can accept New Zealand Dollars in exchange for bitcoin, for example. Other exchanges are known for certain pairs. Bithumb, for example, has particularly strong liquidity in the ETH/KRW (South Korean Won) pair at the moment (and it’s easily the most popular cryptocurrency exchange in Korea).
Let’s say a trader has bought Bitcoin for almost $20,000 in December 2017. The current price of this crypto is around $7,000-$8,000. It is evident that he has made a mistake purchasing Bitcoin at its tops. Why do many beginner traders do those mistakes? The main reason for this is lack of knowledge and some typical emotions that make them buying when the price grows.
If you’re not careful when it comes to cryptocurrency trading, you could find yourself gambling more than you’re trading, and eventually you might lose all your money. Trading is not a game, and just as there is real money to be made, there is real money to be lost. Doing your research and keeping the following concepts in mind when trading could help you avoid the pitfalls of cryptocurrency trading.
There are lots of studies about emotion in trading. Fear of missing out, greed, etc. are very common causes for people to make mistakes while trading. No matter how experienced you are, you will eventually be led by emotions and this might make you lose money, so you have to prepare yourself to do it as little as possible and to control yourself better or you will lose more than win.
Now, about mean reversion. When looking back at charts for cryptocurrency trading from the times gone by, most of the plays have been in the momentum category. If we have the condition for mean reversion with a range-bound environment, one should be very cautious when we have momentum. If everyone else is buying and you’re trying to sell you are going to get run over as if standing on the tracks in front of a freight train.
Let’s say on January 2, 2017, you owned $1,000 and exchanged it into euros (EUR) with another market trader at a rate of EUR€0.9565, leaving you with EUR€956.50. Then, on November 24, 2017, the value of the US dollar had fallen from EUR€0.9565 to EUR€0.8380, so you decide to exchange your euros back into US dollars. After finding someone willing to sell their US dollars for your euros, you carry out the exchange at the new price. Your EUR€956.50 is now worth $1,141.40, leaving you with a profit of a little more than 14%.
Known for handling one of the largest Bitcoin volumes out of all the crypto exchanges globally, Bittrex allows you to decide the trading rates with a service fee of around 0.25%. Moreover, a lot of your time will be saved as the verification process in Bittrex is pretty fast which allows you to start the trading process without any major halt. The platform supports two types of accounts namely, Basic and Advanced with withdrawal funds up to 3 BTC/day to 100 BTC/day, respectively.
Not all traders make gains from trading, since this is a zero-sum game (for everyone who benefits someone else loses on the other side).The Altcoins market is driven by large whales (yes, the same ones responsible for placing huge blocks of hundreds of Bitcoins on the order book). The whales are just waiting patiently for innocent little fish like us to make mistakes. Even if you aspire to trade on a daily basis, sometimes it is better not to earn and do nothing, instead of jumping into the rushing water and exposing your coins to losses. From my experience, there are days where you only keep your profits by not trading at all.
Arbitrage is the process of buying then immediately selling something for a profit. This is possible when there are price differences between different marketplaces. For example, buying certain DVDs at your local store for $10 only to sell them online for $20 each, doubling your money in the process. In our case, it’s buying cryptocurrency on one exchange and then immediately selling it at another. Arbitrage is based on exploiting market inefficiencies and is popular in all kinds of markets, including the stock and FOREX markets.
On the other hand, some coins serve a very unique function in the real world. For example, Power Ledger is a fairly new and interesting cryptocurrency. The goal of this project is to provide a system for consumers to trade electricity with one another. For a young project such as this, the best thing you can do is first decide whether you believe in the technology and the team behind it. The second thing you can do is read news surrounding the project. All of that information, along with a look at the coin’s market cap, is going to ultimately determine whether you think the technology might reach mainstream adoption, thus making an investment worth your while.
To read Part 6 of BTCManager’s ‘A Guide to Trading Cryptocurrency,’ click here. In this trading guide, we will introduce you to a useful concept that can be used for trading, amongst other things. Linear regression is a simple, easy-to-use strategy that can be utilized to identify entry and exit points based on the price action of the cryptocurrency. What…

You’ll find that different exchanges cater to different markets. Today, most countries have at least one cryptocurrency exchange specializing in their own currency. There are exchanges that can accept New Zealand Dollars in exchange for bitcoin, for example. Other exchanges are known for certain pairs. Bithumb, for example, has particularly strong liquidity in the ETH/KRW (South Korean Won) pair at the moment (and it’s easily the most popular cryptocurrency exchange in Korea).
The first thing you need to do before you invest in a crypto is to analyze its trading volumes. As a rule, always go for cryptos that have high daily trading volumes, unless there are some big upcoming news about a low volume crypto. High volumes signal to a Crypto’s liquidity, and the presence of an active community. The problem with low volume cryptos is that in most cases, they lack a strong community backing them, and they can easily get delisted from exchanges, leading to losses.
ICOs, as you may have guessed, are much like IPOs. This is where coins are offered for the first time to the public. ICOs are not offered through exchanges, but rather you buy them directly from the creators of the project. Usually (it’s different for each project) you will send them Bitcoin or Ethereum that they will use to fund their project; in turn you receive a certain amount of their new coin.

No, the successful trader is not me. I’ve gotten lucky a few times and I’m still refining and trying out strategies; on the other hand, I’m part of communities of people who trade on a daily basis to grow their portfolios, and while some of the results can be attributed to luck, a majority of it is based on fundamentals, good habits, and experience.
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