Technical analysis is not the be-all end-all of trading. It’s a tool to help you. Studying charts for hours trying to find patterns is not what’s going to make you money. Zooming in from a 15-minute chart to a 5-minute chart to find a pattern that’s not there is probably going to lose you money. Technical analysis works a good amount of the time, but don’t blindly follow it. If signals point to a trade that you don’t feel right about, it’s best to trust your gut and live to fight another day.
To stress some points made above, realize that a diverse portfolio and investment strategy will eat into gains as often as it staves off losses. The only way to make big profits most of the time is to make risky moves. If you go all in on a single coin at a given price and it goes up, that is a payday. If it goes down, your investable funds are locked into that crypto (unless you want to sell at a loss). Diverse strategies protect against this, but they will also eat into your potential gains (as it is rare for everything to go up or down at once). Know what you are looking for and know how to weight your portfolio to reflect that.
BTC saw a pump last night that only lasted about 10 minutes in terms of the significant part of the move. Since then we have consolidated for 9 hours giving some of the move back. This is still healthy consolidation on the 4 hour and even a potential bull flag. Bulls are trying to hold the back test of 4 hour EMA supports. We are still in a 4 hour lower high ...

The natural inclination for crypto investors is to identify a new altcoin with the potential for growth, invest heavily when it's still inexpensive to do so, and then reap the rewards when the value increases. That being said, the altcoin market is growing so quickly that many new digital currencies hitting the market might not be good long-term investments.
If you are investing in coins for the long-term, the safest strategy is holding, but day-trading, or even casual trading can be profitable in the short term, allowing you to increase your stack relatively faster. Whether you’re a beginner to crypto trading or just trying to take a chance in this exciting new market, here are 10 mistakes you should avoid.
You cannot “buy the dips” if you have all your money to invest already invested. LET US STRESS THIS POINT! The point should be obvious, but it bears repeating over and over. It is tempting to go all-in, but that limits your options. Consider always having some funds to the side to buy an unforeseen downturn. Even if you want to “go all-in” on crypto… leave yourself at least a little money to the side just in case. If you are all-in and the price takes a hard downturn, it takes lots of options off the table. It is hard not to go all-in when a coin goes down 60% – 80% over the course of weeks or months, but sometimes they go down even more than that, and it is wise to always prepare for the worst case.
There are many groups on Facebook where you can find likeminded folks who will happily talk crypto all day but the problem is that 99% of these groups are filled with people who have only a very basic understanding of cryptocurrency and the knowledge available here is not particularly strong. I have recently left almost every single group on Facebook as, in my opinion, they are largely filled with FUD.
Let’s discuss the correct way of using the order book. A coin’s value is determined by the last executed transaction, at the junction between buyers and sellers, or according to the supply and demand forces. Those supply and demand commands are arranged in a table, better known as the order book. In crypto, it’s all about volatility. Thus, and following the previous tips given in our crypto trading article, when you enter a position it is recommended that you set the sell level to take profits. Alternatively, while aspiring to make it simultaneously, set a stop loss to minimize losses. But how will we know exactly where to place these commands? To identify both resistance and support areas, we start by analyzing the graph at the most basic level. A beginner’s technical analysis article will assist with this task. We identify points where we want to take profit (resistance levels) and simultaneously identify support levels. By referring to the order book we will find the optimal levels at which we will actually place these commands. Note that if support levels break down it is time to cut the losses.
Ripple continues to remain pegged down by this supply zone and the EMAs as it tries to break out from that descending trendline. The lower trendline has been adjusted and we can see that it has tested near it multiple times and is now attempting to break past resistance and make its way back to the FIB level or the supply zone above. MACD seems to be signaling ...
(BTW, don’t you love the price predictions on Bitcoin that pundits come up with from time to time? Talk about a wide price and time spread. And they are always disclaimed with something like “these predictions should be taken with a grain of salt” and “do your own research” and “this is no way constitutes investment advice”. Imagine if there was a “sell side analyst” job in crypto. Talk about a great gig…)
When buying coins, and especially with Bitcoin, you will notice that your purchase is in decimal. A Bitcoin itself is relatively expensive, around $10,000 at the moment (as of 15th Feb '18). If you were to purchase say $5,000 of Bitcoin, you would at today's rate be purchasing around 0.5 of Bitcoin. Do not ever worry about this; Bitcoin operates at eight decimals places. You do not need to own a whole Bitcoin or any coin for that matter. Consider it like pence in the pound or cents in the dollar, but with more decimal places.
All the same, you should be careful where you put your money. Many HYIPs out there are simply scams. You might end up losing all your investment. Before you put money in any program, it is advisable to gather as much information as possible to know whether the company pays. As for this company, we strongly recommend that you get more information about it from a reliable HYIP monitor, before you take that bold step invest.
No, the successful trader is not me. I’ve gotten lucky a few times and I’m still refining and trying out strategies; on the other hand, I’m part of communities of people who trade on a daily basis to grow their portfolios, and while some of the results can be attributed to luck, a majority of it is based on fundamentals, good habits, and experience.
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