The top of the order book will show you the lowest price at which someone is willing to sell a cryptocurrency, and the highest price at which someone is willing to buy it — but that doesn’t mean you can buy or sell the amount you want at that price. In fact, the amounts of a cryptocurrency that people are offering to buy or sell at the top of the order book are often quite small, which means that, if you’re trying to buy or sell a larger amount, you’ll have to go deeper into the order book: finding a counterparty who’s offering a price that isn’t as good as the “market price.”
Finally, always check, double check and triple check while trading – a simple tip that even seasoned crypto holders forget. When setting up buy or sell orders, make sure your numbers add up, as even the smallest of typos can see you lose an eye-watering amount. Also, when dealing with an exchange, make sure you’re sending coins to the correct address.
Disclaimer: Trading carries a high level of risk, and may not be suitable for all investors. Before deciding to invest you should carefully consider your investment objectives, level of experience, and risk appetite. The possibility exists that you could sustain a loss of some or all of your initial investment and therefore you should not invest money that you cannot afford to lose. You should be aware of all the risks associated with foreign exchange trading, and seek advice from an independent financial advisor if you have any doubts.
Set limit orders for a few dollars under or over recent lows and highs. This can result in you buying or selling before BTC hits resistance. Sure, you can use crazy TA skills to find support and resistance levels, but you can also eye out levels by looking at a chart. 9 times out of 10 you’ll be able to eyeball a general support or resistance level and get close to the level a pro would have charted out (partly because the price has likely stalled on / bounced off those levels before; little parlor trick).
I’m a nomad from The States, currently residing in Indonesia. Can you suggest the best global service for wallets/exchanges? In The States it’s Coinbase but its supported countries are extremely limited for my needs limited. I need something I can access in basically any country without issue. I know there are a options out there, but I wanted to get you opinion of how other travelers have gotten past this.
You could try this instead: Develop your own day trading strategy with indicators and rules that you understand and hold yourself to. Then read the news, but read it with a grain of salt — and try not to make trading decisions based on rumors that might be debunked the very next day. You shouldn’t buy just because you see the price rise and fear missing out.
Bart Smith, the head of digital assets at trading giant Susquehanna, told that BTC remains the best option for those willing to invest in virtual currencies due to its functionality and widespread use. He called bitcoin “the currency of the Internet” and praised its numerous real-world use cases, such as cross-border payments or bitcoin ATMs, introduced in Europe for the first time in June.
Suppose you’re watching BTC’s chart and notice multiple Doji candlesticks, a classic indicator of indecision in the market. You have a feeling from a few other indicators that the price is about to rise, so you buy more Bitcoin — but alas, the indecision swings the other way, and you’ve lost money (but hopefully not that much, since you’re placing stop-loss orders!).
If you are doing any active trading, set stop losses. For any coins not in your medium or long-term holds, always set stop losses. This is important for several reasons — the most obvious is mitigating your losses. But more importantly, you force yourself to decide on a point of acceptable loss, and because you now have a reference point, you are able to measure your effectiveness to keep or adjust for future trades. Sometimes, during a market dip, altcoins can plummet, and stop losses can lead to profitability by automatically selling for fiat that you can use to re-enter at lower prices.
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